In football, the Giants beat the 49ers, 17-3.

  • anthox

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    We generally refer to specific sports teams as “they.” So, “The team is good,” but, “I like the Giants because they are good.”
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    I found "In football, the Giants beat the 49ers, 17-3."

    When a subject is a proper noun as with the Giants, does it count as plural?

    Shouldn't it be singular?

    The team the Giants is a group and the US is also a group, but people don't say the US ARE.

    source: BEAT | Cambridge English Dictionary에서의 의미
    Even in BE where a plural verb is used after a "singular" team name (England beat Australia) where AE woud use beats, if the team name is plural (like Giants or Spurs in soccer) the verb is plural. Spurs beat Fulham. Tottenham beats Fulham.
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    When a subject is a proper noun as with the Giants, does it count as plural?
    Shouldn't it be singular?
    Here in the U.S., we have been using the plural for sports teams with plural names for as long as they have existed.
    When such use is so well established, it completely overrides any "fixing" suggested by so-called "rules" imposed upon learners of our language.
    [cross-posted]
     

    Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    I found "In football, the Giants beat the 49ers, 17-3."

    When a subject is a proper noun as with the Giants, does it count as plural? ...
    The game is over, finished. "Beat" is in the simple past tense. That tense is the same for singular and plural. The discussion in previous posts is generally correct, but it has nothing to do with understanding this sentence.
     
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