in for one

  • Joelline

    Senior Member
    American English
    Hello, nasridine,

    nasridine said:
    So what is the complete sentence?
    "This is a super deal. I'm in for one"?

    "I'm in for one" doesn't make any sense here. Perhaps you mean:

    "This is a super deal. I'm in!"

    This would mean that the "deal" is so good that you "want in" or you want to have a part in it.

    In this sentence, the subject is "I"; the verb is "am."

    I hope this helps.
    Joelline
     

    elroy

    Moderator: EHL, Arabic, Hebrew, German(-Spanish)
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    I'm a little confused, Nasridine. First you ask about "go in for one" but then you give an example with "I'm in for one" (without "go"). The verb in the first example is "go in" and it's "am" in the second one (as Joelline said).

    "I'm in for one" means "I'm about to experience one." For example, "I'm in for a surprise" means "I'm about to be surprised by something." "I'm in for a great year" means "I'm about to have a great year." As Joelline said, though, it doesn't really make sense after "This is a super deal."

    Do you have more context?
     

    elroy

    Moderator: EHL, Arabic, Hebrew, German(-Spanish)
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    Ah - good job, Laura. :thumbsup: That must be it.

    I, for one, would have used a different word order. ;)
     

    nasridine

    Senior Member
    USA
    Chinese, China
    Sorry for that. I'm just not so sure which verb to use before "in for one", be or go?
    Here is an example in dealsea.com forum. Look at the third comment from the bottom.
    http://www.dealsea.com/forums/viewtopic.php?t=6637

    elroy said:
    I'm a little confused, Nasridine. First you ask about "go in for one" but then you give an example with "I'm in for one" (without "go"). The verb in the first example is "go in" and it's "am" in the second one (as Joelline said).

    "I'm in for one" means "I'm about to experience one." For example, "I'm in for a surprise" means "I'm about to be surprised by something." "I'm in for a great year" means "I'm about to have a great year." As Joelline said, though, it doesn't really make sense after "This is a super deal."

    Do you have more context?
     

    maxiogee

    Banned
    English
    nasridine said:
    In some deal forum, I often see this phrase.
    What is the verb that has been omited?
    "go in for one"?

    Many people in Ireland use this phrase early in the evening when they are approaching the doors of a public house - "I'll go in for one".
    One is rarely, if ever, all they have! :D
     
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