In his hall made of glass canopy

QuentinO.

New Member
French
Hello,
I am talking about the arched designed by William Barlow for the St Pancras station roof in London.
The context is as follows:

« Mr Barlow welcomes me in his hall made of glass canopy. »

Is the sentence right ?

The hall is referring to the terminus hall at St Pancras Station.

Thank you for your time.

Quentin
 
  • analeeh

    Senior Member
    English - UK
    No. It can't be 'made of glass canopy' - a canopy is an architectural feature. So a hall has a glass canopy, it isn't made of glass canopy.

    You could possibly say 'in his glass-canopied hall'.
     

    QuentinO.

    New Member
    French
    Thank you for tour response 🙏
    Thank you for tour response 🙏
    No. It can't be 'made of glass canopy' - a canopy is an architectural feature. So a hall has a glass canopy, it isn't made of glass canopy.
    Thanks
    You could possibly say 'in his glass-canopied hall'.
    Hello analeeh, I thought about what you said. What about « Mr Barlow welcomes me under his arched made of glass canopy »
    Would it work here?
    Thank you
    Quentin
    No. It can't be 'made of glass canopy' - a canopy is an architectural feature. So a hall has a glass canopy, it isn't made of glass canopy.

    You could possibly say 'in his glass-canopied
    No. It can't be 'made of glass canopy' - a canopy is an architectural feature. So a hall has a glass canopy, it isn't made of glass canopy.

    You could possibly say 'in his glass-canopied hall'.
     
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