in/into

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i_speak_spanish

Senior Member
Peru
Hi,

Can I change:

Just as Debbie was stepping out of the elevator, she realized she was on the wrong floor, so she quickly jumped back in before the doors closed

into:

Just as Debbie was stepping out of the elevator, she realized she was on the wrong floor, so she quickly jumped back into before the doors closed

Can anyone explain me the difference between in and into, please?
 
  • Glinda

    Member
    English US
    The difference is minor, when you talk about motion. 'Into' requires a location. "she jumped in to the elevator before the doors closed"
     

    i_speak_spanish

    Senior Member
    Peru
    I think I got it, you said:

    "She jumped into the elevator before the doors closed", right?

    or "She jumped in to the elevator before the doors closed"?

    What's the difference?
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    She jumped into the elevator ... < OK

    She jumped in to the elevator ... < grammatically OK, probably, but not used

    She jumped in the elevator ... < OK, but unless you are careful it says that she stood inside the elevator and jumped up and down.

    ... jumped into ... implies movement from one location to another.
    ... jumped in ... implies movement up and down in one location.

    In the right context, "She jumped in the elevator ..." will be understood to mean the same as "She jumped into the elevator ...".
     

    Thomas1

    Senior Member
    polszczyzna warszawska
    Hi,

    Can I change:

    Just as Debbie was stepping out of the elevator, she realized she was on the wrong floor, so she quickly jumped back in before the doors closed

    into:

    Just as Debbie was stepping out of the elevator, she realized she was on the wrong floor, so she quickly jumped back into before the doors closed

    Can anyone explain me the difference between in and into, please?
    In this context no.
    Into is a preposition here and that is why you need a location as was previously said. On the other hand in functions here as an adverb, technically it hints at the way you went not at the direction (although, it comes across differently), and you could replace it with another adverbs which would semantically be appropriate here.

    Panj's example:
    She jumped in the elevator
    illustrates in as a preposition, but it is not used with a verb of motion, it implies jumping inside the elevator.

    panjandrum said:
    [...]
    She jumped in to the elevator ... < grammatically OK, probably, but not used
    [...]
    Interesting, I'd rather expext this construction with an infinitive:
    She jumped in to help them rescue people in the burning house.


    Thomas
     

    keepsakes

    Member
    English/Chinese Canada/China
    To jump into is a transitive verb [phrase], it requires the object that the person/thing is jumping into.

    To jump in/to hop in (intransitive, without an object) is approximately equal to "to enter".

    Your original sentence:


    Just as Debbie was stepping out of the elevator, she realized she was on the wrong floor, so she quickly jumped back into the elevator before the doors closed.
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    [...]
    Interesting, I'd rather expect this construction with an infinitive:
    She jumped in to help them rescue people in the burning house.
    Thomas
    Of course, yes, if the to is part of a verb form it's natural. I was thinking only of her jumping in to <noun>; that seems completely alien to me.
     

    Ms Missy

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Re: Just as Debbie was stepping out of the elevator, she realized she was on the wrong floor, so she quickly jumped back into the elevator before the doors closed.

    As Glinda said, the difference is very slight, and mostly in the connotation. Consider:

    The man walked in the street. (instead of on the sidewalk)

    The man walked into the street. (stepped off the curb to cross the street)

    Those two example are close , but a situation where you definitely wouldn't use "into" would be" The children played in the rain.

    Although we did run into a lot of rain on our way to the fair.

    Does that make it a little clearer?
     
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