In july the weather in England was sunny

Smiley=]

New Member
English
Hallo

I am writing about my holiday

I am trying to say ....
In July the weather in England was sunny when I went with my family to Belgium.

Im Juli die Wetter in England sonnig wenn war, bin ich mit meiner Familie nach Belgien gefahren.

I'm not sure if that's correct in german
 
  • Derselbe

    Senior Member
    Deutsch, German, ドイツ語
    Im Juli war(1) das(2) Wetter in England sonnig, als(3) ich mit meiner Familie nach Beglien fuhr.

    1: The verb is in the 2nd position in main clauses.
    2: It's "das" Wetter
    3: The subjunction comes after the comma.

    The sentence still sounds strange. Also the english sentence sounds somewhat complicated. Why don't you say:
    When I went to Belgium with my family, the weather in England was sunny.
    =>
    Als ich mit meiner Familie nach Belgien fuhr, schien in England die Sonne.
     

    Smiley=]

    New Member
    English
    Thank you ...
    I will use this sentence
    "Als ich mit meiner Familie nach Belgien fuhr, schien in England die Sonne"
    Why aren't the words in bold gefahren referring to the past tense. I don't understand those words
     

    saftschubse

    Member
    english -canada
    The bold verbs are the simple past, used in written German. The verbs are fahren and scheinen.
    The compound form (aux+participle) is used when speaking. (i.e: bin gefahren)
     

    Frank78

    Senior Member
    German
    "Als ich mit meiner Familie nach Belgien fuhr, schien in England die Sonne"

    simple past and present perfect are interchangeable in German. (both refer to the past)

    So you also can say:
    "Als ich mit meiner Familie nach Belgien gefahren bin, hat die Sonne in England geschienen"
     

    Derselbe

    Senior Member
    Deutsch, German, ドイツ語
    Smiley=];6689514 said:
    Thank you ...
    I will use this sentence
    "Als ich mit meiner Familie nach Belgien fuhr, schien in England die Sonne"
    Why aren't the words in bold gefahren referring to the past tense. I don't understand those words
    It depends what you want to say. If you're still in Belgium I'd prefer
    "Als ich mit meiner Familie nach Belgien gefahren bin, schien in England die Sonne."
    in this case i'd consider "fuhr" to be wrong.

    But if you allready left Belgium and you are just reporting about an event in the past "fuhr" is preferable.
    Die difference between Präteritum and Perfekt in German is quite difficult to understand. The question as to which one to use is influenced by a lot of criteria. I had a conversation about that with a professor of linguistics the other day and he said that by now nobody found a really convincing explaination to describe the usage of them.
     

    Derselbe

    Senior Member
    Deutsch, German, ドイツ語
    From the three absolutely contradictory answers you got on your question you can tell that there even is no consent regarding that issure among native speakers. :D
     

    saftschubse

    Member
    english -canada
    Smiley, you surely haven't learned the simple past yet. We German learners get started on the present perfect first as it is more commonly heard when referring to events in the past. However, once you start reading German, you will see the simple past more.

    Ist das nicht richtig?
    You native German speakers don't use the simple past (except for a few verbs) in conversation...?
     

    Frank78

    Senior Member
    German
    That´s right saftschubse, it´s rare in spoken German. "Sein" still often appears in the simple past. "Ich war im Kino" instead of "Ich bin im Kino gewesen".
     

    brian

    Senior Member
    AmE (New Orleans)
    A number of the small, common words, like sein, haben, wollen, etc., are often used (in standard German) in the simple past: war, hatte, wollte. And of course the simple past of sein and haben are necessary to form the perfect past.

    If you're a student, you should probably avoid the less common simple past forms until you learn them, otherwise your teacher might lift an eyebrow or two. :)
     

    brian

    Senior Member
    AmE (New Orleans)
    Well yeah, but that's the problem with asking natives for help on homework, etc. when you are taking a class. Oftentimes it's difficult for natives to know what's "beginner" and what's "advanced."

    It would be like you helping an ESL student and saying for example "had drunk," not knowing that the student had not yet even learned the past perfect (or the irregular verb to drink). :)
     

    kayokid

    Senior Member
    English, USA
    Hello. Just to add another side to the discussion... When I was studying German the rule was that with "als" the simple past was the correct form to use (when referring to one time in the past).
     
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