In light of

notyouraveragematteo

Senior Member
English, Japanese
Can one say, He was able to understand the text in light of his new interpretation for it.

Does anybody have any more examples of 'in light of'?

THanks.
 
  • Nickpetry870

    New Member
    FL
    English - USA
    One could say that, it is, however; a little shaky.

    Another example of the use of 'in light of' would be similar to this:

    In light of recent events, he was still able to attend the party.

    This would be that someone bad has happened recently, which could have impaired his ability to attend the party.

    Hope this helps.
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Can one say, He was able to understand the text in light of his new interpretation for it.

    Does anybody have any more examples of 'in light of'?

    THanks.
    The difficulty with this example is that in light of usually refers to some additional or external factor.
    It would be OK if you had written:
    He was able to understand the text in light of Bill's new interpretation ...

    (Hello Nickpetry870, and welcome :))
     

    emma42

    Senior Member
    British English
    Yes, welcome, Nickpetry870.

    I usually say "In the light of..." Without the "the" it sounds AE to me, but that might just be my imagination.

    In the light of what we have just seen on the TV news, I don't think we should travel to XXX for the next few months.

    In the light of recent research, GPs are becoming reluctant to prescribe so many antibiotics to younger children.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    A judge might say, "In light of the fact that the dead man just walked into our courtroom, I am inclined to dismiss the murder charges against his wife."
     

    nzfauna

    Senior Member
    New Zealand, English
    I use "in light of"; so it's not entirely AE.

    e.g.s

    In light of new evidence, the judge ruled in the defendant's favour.

    In light of the fact that the Prime Minister could not attend the conference, it was postponed.
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Emma, thank you!

    I was beginning to think that it was only me who said "in the light of".

    I remember being struck by the "in light of"/"in the light of" distinction when I lived in Canada for a couple of years in the 1990s...
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    I use "in light of"; so it's not entirely AE.

    e.g.s

    In light of new evidence, the judge ruled in the defendant's favour.

    In light of the fact that the Prime Minister could not to attend the conference, it was postponed.

    Entirely? or Uniquely?
     
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