In liquor

sugarhillavenue

Member
US- English
"Peter Quint was found, by a labourer going to work early, stone dead on the road from the village: a catastrophe explained--superficially at least--by a visible wound to his head; such a wound as might have been produced by a fatal slip, in the dark and after leaving the public-house, on a steepish icy slope, a wrong path altogether of which he lay. The icy slope, the turn mistaken at night and in liquor, accounted for much--practically, the in end and after the inquest and boundless chatter, for everything.

Is this referring to Peter or the road. Does it mean that he was drunk.
Also, does a public-house refer to a saloon?
 
  • nzfauna

    Senior Member
    New Zealand, English
    Oh my, where did you get this. Was it written by a native English speaker?

    In liquor probably means he was drunk - but I've never seen this phrase.

    A public house is probably a "pub" = a bar or drinking establishment.
     

    Dimcl

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    Oh my, where did you get this. Was it written by a native English speaker?
    It's from "The Turn of the Screw" by Henry Joyce, Nzfauna.

    In liquor probably means he was drunk - but I've never seen this phrase.
    I believe that it was a phrase used many years ago to describe someone who was drunk.

    A public house is probably a "pub" = a bar or drinking establishment.
    :tick:
     
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