In Midsomer Norton / Great Britain (in, im, in dem)

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SellenDavison

Member
English- England
Hello, I have become very confused on when to use the different phrases for in.
For example, if I were to say 'I live in Midsomer Norton' (a town) do I use a different 'in' than if I were to say 'I live in Great Britain' ?

What I mean to say is, which do I use when?
Thank you, sorry if it is unclear.
 
  • Gernot Back

    Senior Member
    German - Germany
    For example, if I were to say 'I live in Midsomer Norton' (a town) do I use a different 'in' than if I were to say 'I live in Great Britain' ?
    "Im" is a portemantau word consisting of the preposition in and the definite article in the dative case (masculone or neuter).

    You would usually contract in + dem to im, unless you want to put a specific emphasis on either one of the two separate words.

    Note that "im" cannot be used as a contraction of the preposition in + relative pronoun dem. These always have to stay separate.

    E.g.: Das ist das Haus, in dem ich geboren bin.

    As far as geographical place names (toponyms) are concerned, there are some that go with a definite article and some that don't in German:

    You would speak of das Saarland with the definite article, whereas you don't use the definite article with Deutschland or England. That is why you have to say im Saarland, but in England and in Deutschland.

    By the way: I can't think of any town in German speaking countries or even the world that would be used with a German definite article (masculine or neuter) which would then lead to "im"in combination with the preposition "in", but this doesn't necessarily mean that there aren't any.

    But even the Portuguese town of Porto (Oporto) or the Capital of Egypt Cairo (al-Qāhira), which always go with a definite article in local languages would always be used without the article in German.
     
    Last edited:

    SellenDavison

    Member
    English- England
    "Im" is a portemantau word consisting of the preposition in and the definite article in the dative case (masculone or neuter).

    You would usually contract in + dem to im, unless you want to put a specific emphasis on either one of the two separate words.

    Note that "im" cannot be used as a contraction of the preposition in + relative pronoun dem. These always have to stay separate.

    E.g.: Das ist das Haus, in dem ich geboren bin.

    As far as geographical place names (toponyms) are concerned, there are some that go with a definite article and some that don't in German:

    You would speak of das Saarland with the definite article, whereas you don't use the definite article with Deutschland or England. That is why you have to say im Saarland, but in England and in Deutschland.

    By the way: I can't think of any town in German speaking countries or even the world that would be used with a German definite article (masculine or neuter) which would then lead to "im"in combination with the preposition "in", but this doesn't necessarily mean that there aren't any.

    But even the Portuguese town of Porto (Oporto) or the Capital of Egypt Cairo (al-Qāhira), which always go with a definite article in local languages would always be used without the article in German.
    Thank you! so if I were to say 'in Berlin', it would be 'Im Berlin' or 'In Berlin'?
     

    Demiurg

    Senior Member
    German
    By the way: I can't think of any town in German speaking countries or even the world that would be used with a German definite article (masculine or neuter) which would then lead to "im"in combination with the preposition "in", but this doesn't necessarily mean that there aren't any.

    The first part of "Den Haag" (The Hague) is in fact an article. Therefore you'll sometimes find the phrase "die Regierung im Haag" in newspapers.
     
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