in <most /a few/ a number of> cases,

amby

Banned
chinese
Can I add most /a few/a number of instead of many in front of cases? If my answers are incorrect, can you explain why they are incorrect?
The Goulburn Valley is situated in the south-east corner of the Australian continent, in the state of Victoria. Because of the introduction of irrigation over a century ago, primary industry flourished, resulting in a multitude of orchards and market gardens. After World War II, migrants flocked to the area in search of work on the farms, and in _most/a few/ a number of ________cases, establishing a property of thei
 
  • owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    All these words and phrases look possible, Amby. I would use any of them without hesitation as long as the phrase made sense in my sentence. All these words and phrases would make sense in your example.
     

    heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Your suggestions are all grammatically correct. 'Most' and 'a number' work well in this context, but I'm not so sure you would want to use the word 'few' as an alternative to 'many'.
     

    owlman

    Member
    English - United States
    ^^ I agree completely with heypresto.

    You could also say:
    lots of
    lots of the
    a lot of
    a lot of the
    several
    several of the
    multiple

    These are also acceptable gramatically, but they imply less than "many":
    a few
    a few of the
    a couple
    a couple of
    a couple of the
    some
    some of the
     
    Last edited:

    heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Amby's original question was asking about alternatives to using 'many' in front of 'cases'.

    Suggesting 'a couple' or 'a few' surely doesn't convey the meaning of 'many'?
     

    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    Your suggestions are all grammatically correct. 'Most' and 'a number' work well in this context, but I'm not so sure you would want to use the word 'few' as an alternative to 'many'.
    I would really like to hear from Amby on this topic, Hey Presto. I got the idea that Amby was most interested in the grammatical possibility of using such phrases in the place where "few", etc. are situated in the sentence. That idea could easily be wrong. It's always great to hear from the original poster from time to time.

    Hello, Amby. Are you asking whether these phrases mean the same thing? If you are, they don't. The words "most" and "many" have different meanings. The phrases "a few" and "a number of" are pretty similar in meaning.

    Here is your question: Can I add most /a few/a number of instead of many in front of cases? If my answers are incorrect, can you explain why they are incorrect? Could you explain your question for us a little?
     

    amby

    Banned
    chinese
    Let me clarify my question. I am asking you if the other answers can be possible except for ' many' in terms of grammar and meaning?
     

    heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I think the answer remains the same as much of the above - the other suggestions would be grammatically correct, but would have different meanings. It really comes down to whether you mean, in your original sentence, many (a significant number of) cases, or most (the majority of ) cases, or a few (not many) cases.
     

    Godo159

    Senior Member
    Spanish - Spain
    I came across this question from an official exam in an online exercise, some alternatives were not accepted because the instructions specified you had to use only one word. This means there are still other valid alternatives: "some" and "several", since the context does not give any clues as to whether there were a few or a lot of them.
     
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