in my barefoot days

Anoukmac

Senior Member
French - France
Hello,

A 50 or 60 year-old American man is talking about Judy Collins:
I'm just as happy now to see her performance (as) when I was in my barefoot days.

My first understanding was that he was talking about the seventies, because the Hippies would walk barefoot.
But I saw that barefoot could be related to women staying home looking after the kids, so could it mean "the days when he stayed home looking after their only daughter"? Or could it be related to barefoot skiiing?

Thanks for your help!
 
  • ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    Hullo Anouk. Who is this American man?

    EDIT: I'm not going to ask And who's Judy Collins? because I feel I ought to know:eek:
     

    Anoukmac

    Senior Member
    French - France
    Hi Ewie, thanks for your help. We don't know much about this guy. He's the father of a 23 year-old girl who's the main character of a TV series I can't talk much about (the client is very careful that we don't say anything about it before it's on TV in the US). Anyway, he lives a quiet life in the Midwest.

    Judy Collins is a singer who started to be famous in the sixties-seventies ;-)
     

    Biffo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Maybe it's explained by this article.

    Barefoot Days
    by Sharon Pearson on June 15th, 2012
    I can remember and almost feel it now, the cool green grass between my toes and remember the great joy and elation we children in the foot hills of North Carolina had when we were allowed to go barefoot for the first time at the beginning of each summer.
    http://www.buildfaith.org/2012/06/15/barefoot-days/
     
    Last edited:

    RM1(SS)

    Senior Member
    English - US (Midwest)
    My guess would be that he's referring to his childhood - children are more likely to spend a lot of time outside barefoot than adults are.

    Biffo's link doesn't want to load for me, but from the lead-in he quoted I suspect it also refers to the writer's childhood.
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    If he's in his mid-fifties now, he is perhaps slightly young to have been a hippie (who were, anyway, not especially known for being barefoot). I concur with Biffo and RM1.
     

    Biffo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Just as an aside, for some children in deprived areas, lack of shoes implies poverty. I don't think this applies here though.

    If you can see the face of the speaker you may get a clue about whether it is a sad or happy recollection.
     

    Anoukmac

    Senior Member
    French - France
    Thanks a lot to all of you. I think you're right, he must be talking about his childhood. From his face, it's more a funny and happy recollection.
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    Given the guy's age and the fact that he talks about having been happy to see the performer in his barefoot days, I think it's more likely to be the ageing hippy angle that you first thought of. After all, if he was a barefoot child at the time, music is perhaps not the sort of thing that he would remember; whereas hippiness and folk music go together. I definitely remember barefoot hippies and, if the man is around 60, then he could well have been one of them.
     

    Anoukmac

    Senior Member
    French - France
    Given the guy's age and the fact that he talks about having been happy to see the performer in his barefoot days, I think it's more likely to be the ageing hippy angle that you first thought of. After all, if he was a barefoot child at the time, music is perhaps not the sort of thing that he would remember; whereas hippiness and folk music go together. I definitely remember barefoot hippies and, if the man is around 60, then he could well have been one of them.
    Thanks, Velisarius. So it could be both.... It's not such a problem for my translation into French since both interpretations would be translated the same way.
     
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