in/on account of my injury.

uchida

Member
Japanese - Japan
I have a question.
This question may be so complicated.

My question is this.
What is the difference between IN and ON?
I think I can almost understand IN and ON which is related to time or place, but IN and ON are often used with a word that isn't related to time or place.
for example, "on account", "on a hunch", "in business", etc.
When I see phrases like those, I think "Why use ON? or Why use IN?".

When you use IN and ON with a word that isn't related to time or place, how do you think?
And if I say "in a hunch", how do you feel weird about an incorrect phrase like "in a hunch"?

Thank you.
 
  • Florentia52

    Modwoman in the attic
    English - United States
    Your question is too general for discussion in this forum, uchida. You are welcome to give us a sentence that uses one of the phrases that confuses you, and we will be happy to discuss that specific example.
     

    uchida

    Member
    Japanese - Japan
    Your question is too general for discussion in this forum, uchida. You are welcome to give us a sentence that uses one of the phrases that confuses you, and we will be happy to discuss that specific example.
    Thank you.
    for example,
    "I did very little exercise in account of my injury."
    I know "on account of" is used as a fixed phrase, but I don't know why you use ON with account. I feel it's ok to use IN instead of ON to me because it's not place. "account" isn't place. So I'm always very confused about IN and ON with a noun that isn't place.
     

    Florentia52

    Modwoman in the attic
    English - United States
    No, it wouldn't be correct to say "in account of." As a general rule, fixed phrases can't be altered. I realize that doesn't help you understand why the phrase uses "on" and not "in," but it might keep you from making mistakes.

    You are taking too limited a view of what "on" can mean. It might be helpful for you to enter it in the search box at the top of the page and review the dictionary definitions.
     

    uchida

    Member
    Japanese - Japan
    No, it wouldn't be correct to say "in account of." As a general rule, fixed phrases can't be altered. I realize that doesn't help you understand why the phrase uses "on" and not "in," but it might keep you from making mistakes.

    You are taking too limited a view of what "on" can mean. It might be helpful for you to enter it in the search box at the top of the page and review the dictionary definitions.
    i see.
    It's important to memorize as a fixed phrase.
    Thank you a lot!
     
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