in/on the exam

welder

Senior Member
Spain - Spanish
Hello,
could you tell me which one is right, please?

Lucy got a good mark IN her Science exam
or
Lucy got a good mark ON her Maths exam

Thanks a bunch.
 
  • obz

    Senior Member
    Yankee English
    Maybe a transatlantic discrepancy, but i would say...

    "on her Science exam/test"
    but
    "in Science class"

    "How did Jane do on her math test?"
    "John got an A on his English exam"


    My English is 100% American, so it's more than possible they say "in" in the UK and Ireland.
     

    obz

    Senior Member
    Yankee English
    Yeah, "in" makes me think something has been nestled inside of a sheet of paper somehow. :D
    lol, poor Spanish speakers with in and on, I really feel bad for them, especially in a situation like this where we don't agree on common usage.

    Anyone else want to pine in on this?
     

    Bigote Blanco

    Senior Member
    Maybe a transatlantic discrepancy, but i would say...

    "on her Science exam/test"
    but
    "in Science class"

    "How did Jane do on her math test?"
    "John got an A on his English exam":tick:

    My English is 100% American, so it's more than possible they say "in" in the UK and Ireland.

    I agree with Obz.

    John got an A on his final exam, but only a B in the science course.

    :)Bigote
     

    Avalar

    Member
    English
    To me, they are both fine, and interchangeable! And you could even say ''She got a good mark for her maths paper'', although you can't ''do well'' for something, it must be in or on.
     

    obz

    Senior Member
    Yankee English
    although you can't ''do well'' for something, it must be in or on.

    Sure you can. It's a different context, but you can do well for something.

    He pitches pretty well for a first baseman.
    She plays the violin very well for a drummer.

    etc.

    But I digress, as it is a different usage all together.
     

    Avalar

    Member
    English
    I think maths in plural sounds awkward and for me ''She got a good mark for her maths paper'' at least to my American ears sounds totally unnatural.

    Where I'm from in England, they're both totally normal - I guess it's just a regional thing.

    Sure you can. It's a different context, but you can do well for something.

    He pitches pretty well for a first baseman.
    She plays the violin very well for a drummer.

    etc.

    But I digress, as it is a different usage all together.

    You're right, what I said only applies to sentences like the ones suggested earlier.
     
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