In/On the lawn/pool

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murat_istanbul

Member
Turkish
Good afternoon everyone.

Are the below examples correct?

  1. I have found a coin in the lawn on my way to work. (e.g. a coin inside/between the green area, not the surface of lawn).
  2. The cutter machine is on the lawn with no battery.

  3. No children are allowed in the swimming-pool without their parents.
  4. A boy lost his toy. I think it is on the swimming-pool. (on the surface of the pool).
Thank you.
 
  • Florentia52

    Modwoman in the attic
    English - United States
    I would use “on the lawn” in both of your examples. If the coin was embedded in the turf, I suppose “in” wouldn’t be incorrect, but it still sounds odd. You could, however, say there are weeds on the lawn.

    I would use “in the swimming pool” in both of those examples.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    If you found it lost between the blades of grass at soil level, you could say you "found it in grass", but not "in the lawn".

    I found my keys on the front lawn of my house hidden in the grass.

    I found my cell phone on the front lawn sitting on the grass.
    (A cell phone would be too large to fit between the blades of grass.)

    Note: Walt Whitman referred to it as "Leaves of Grass" in his poem, I have only ever heard "blades of grass" other than that.

    Note: "Turf" is a synonym for "lawn" but is not usually the term for residential lawns.
     

    murat_istanbul

    Member
    Turkish
    Could you check these please
    1. There is a man swimming in the sea.
    2. There is a ship on the sea on its way to the US. I guess this is correct since the ship can be on the top of sea?
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    It gets complicated because the correct word depends on the exact sentence and context and possibly the speaker's viewpoint.

    There is a man swimming in the sea.

    This sentence is fine but, truthfully, in American English we tend to say ocean so it still sounds a little bit strange to me.

    There is a man swimming in the ocean.

    But then that gets complicated because not all seas are oceans. But "in" is fine.

    There is a ship on the sea on its way to the US.

    The sentence is awkward wording so it doesn't sound right.

    - There is a ship sailing across the ocean on its way to the U.S.
    - There is a ship sailing over the ocean on its way to the U.S.
    - The ship is at sea, on its way to the U.S.
    - While at sea we encountered a ship sailing to the U.S.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    It gets complicated because the correct word depends on the exact sentence and context and possibly the speaker's viewpoint.

    There is a man swimming in the sea.

    This sentence is fine but, truthfully, in American English we tend to say ocean so it still sounds a little bit strange to me.

    There is a man swimming in the ocean.

    But then that gets complicated because not all seas are oceans. But "in" is fine.

    There is a ship on the sea on its way to the US.

    The sentence is awkward wording so it doesn't sound right.

    - There is a ship sailing across the ocean on its way to the U.S.
    - There is a ship sailing over the ocean on its way to the U.S.
    - The ship is at sea, on its way to the U.S.
    - While at sea we encountered a ship sailing to the U.S.
    "At sea" is to distinguish it from "at the port" or "in the port". In both cases the ship is in the water. At sea = traveling; In the port = loading or unloading passengers or cargo.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    We do talk about boats being on the high seas.

    But if you are talking about it physically, it is in the water.

    The boat is heavily loaded and riding low in the water.

    But safety advice messages usually say to be safe on the water when referring to boaters.
     
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