in or with?

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  • KON

    Senior Member
    If I wanted to descrice a man who is wearing dark glasses, I'd say the man with the dark glasses or (as I said above) the man who is wearing dark glasses.

    I run a google search and I also got sentences, saying "a man in dark glasses" and I'm a bit pazzled myself now to be honest.
     

    Nicki_1

    New Member
    English-American
    with does not fit, with would imply that he has dark glasses in his hand,

    therefore you should either say 'the man in dark glasses' or 'the man wearing dark glasses.'
     

    Nymeria

    Senior Member
    English - Barbadian/British/educated in US universities blend
    I don't think that with necessarily implies that the glasses are in his hand. With could mean that they are in his hand, but in a conversational context I think it would be clearly understood that the man was wearing them.

    Person A: "Which man do you mean?"
    Person B: "The man with the dark glasses."

    I think the average person would understand that the man was wearing them. I would even go as far as to say that if he were holding them, it would be mentioned specifically: "The man with the dark glasses in his hands."

    To be completely clear though azzurri you may say,

    "The man with the dark glasses on" or "The man wearing the dark glasses"
     
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