In Paris, as in Rome

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tablecloth

Senior Member
Spanish
Hi, everybody,
I have this sentence in an exercise "In Paris ,_____ in Rome, traffic is heavy" I think the right answer is "as" and not "like", but I don't know why. Is it because "like" is not very common in this sense before a preposition?
I would really appreciate your help because I've been trying to solve it alone for some hours and haven't reached a solution yet.
Thanks a lot.
 
  • PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    As is more common with degrees/amounts; like is more common with "type or kind"

    as = to the same degree, amount, or extent;
    Like - of the same form, appearance, kind, character

    "heavy" here is a adjective of degree.
     

    tablecloth

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    Sorry to bother you again, but I just want to make sure that I've got it right. If i change the adjective for one that's not a "degree" one, then "like" sounds better, isn't it?

    So "In Paris,like in Rome, the weather is wonderful today" is better than "in Paris, as in Rome, the weather is wonderful today", right?

    Thank you for your patience!
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    Hmmm... it sounds more acceptable. (I did say that this is not a rule, it is guidance.)

    Anyway, It also depends on context. The "in X, as in Y," tends to be a set phrase, so changing it to "like" is not common but possible:

    TV Announcer: "Well, that was our Rome correspondent saying how good the weather is there. Andin Paris,like in Rome, the weather is wonderful today so let's go over to our Paris correspondent." is OK

    Try this piece of guidance:

    We have the same rainfall as Norway - where there is a comparison of a word mentioned (rainfall, we and Norway have the same rainfall; Paris and Rome have the same traffic /weather.

    He kicked the ball like a horse - in the manner of something that he is not - a simily
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    So "In Paris, like in Rome, the weather is wonderful today" is better than "in Paris, as in Rome, the weather is wonderful today", right?
    No. "It is" is understood following "like", and that's incorrect. Correct: In Paris, as in Rome, . . .
     
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