in regress or in regression

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Renatrix

Senior Member
polski
A child has a very rare genetic disease. When the disease is stable, the child's development is stable. When the disease is progressing, the child (her development) is regressing. I have two questions here:
1. Which noun should be used to describe the latter process: regress or regression?
2. What structure should be used to say the child's state (or her development) is worsening? She is in regress/regression? The child's development is in regress/regression? Or maybe during regress/regression?
I'm looking for a preposition that will go with the right noun (regress or regression) to say it is happening, the child is in this regressive state now.
 
  • Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    Do you actually mean "regressing" - when the disease is progressing her development goes backwards? She goes from the developmental state of, say, a child of 24 months to that of a child of 22 months?
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    For Andy's benefit (he knows about such things) it would probably be helpful to name the condition. As it stands, I think I understand that you are trying to say:

    A child has a very rare genetic disease (probably 'disorder'). When the disease (probably 'condition') is in remission, the child's development is stable (probably 'normal'). When the disease (probably 'condition') is active, the child health deteriorates.
     

    Renatrix

    Senior Member
    polski
    Do you actually mean "regressing" - when the disease is progressing her development goes backwards? She goes from the developmental state of, say, a child of 24 months to that of a child of 22 months?
    Yes, Andygc.
    The girl has Leigh disease. When the disease is progressing, the child (or her development or both) is regressing.

    A child has a very rare genetic disease (probably 'disorder'). When the disease (probably 'condition') is in remission, the child's development is stable (probably 'normal'). When the disease (probably 'condition') is active, the child health deteriorates.
    Yes, PaulQ, the idea is the child' health deteriorates. But I'd really like to use regress/regression to describe this state:)
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    Thanks, it is known as "Leigh syndrome" - technically you should use "syndrome" to describe the condition.

    The following shows the context for the use of "regression":
    Leigh syndrome
    "Leigh syndrome is a severe neurological disorder that usually becomes apparent in the first year of life. This condition is characterized by progressive loss of mental and movement abilities (psychomotor regression) and typically results in death within two to three years, usually due to respiratory failure. A small number of individuals do not develop symptoms until adulthood or have symptoms that worsen more slowly."
    A child has a very rare genetic condition known as "Leigh syndrome". When the syndrome is in remission, the child's development is normal. When the condition is active, the child suffers psychomotor regression.

    (subject to approval by Andygc.)
     

    Renatrix

    Senior Member
    polski
    Thanks, PaulQ. But could you say that something (e.g. development) or somebody (e.g. a child) is in regression?
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    No. "Regression" is not used that way (nor is "progression"). The child's psychomotor function regresses (or progresses). There is psychomotor regression. But never "psychomotor function is in regression" nor "the child is in regression".
     

    Renatrix

    Senior Member
    polski
    Thanks, Andygc! If regression cannot be used with a preposition (What do you call this kind of structure, e.g. in remission? An adverbial?), I'll rephrase the sentence.
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    in remission?
    "Prepositional modifier" These always follow the construction [preposition + nominal]. They can be adjectival or adverbial

    He is in the garden -> adjectival
    He works in the garden -> adverbial
     
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