in socially productive terms as affecting change

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Blue Apple

Senior Member
Persian (Iran)
Does the bold sentence imply "enable me to discuss the destabilising force of the death drive as an effective force in social changes"?

Text:
However, even here, my argument that art is always bound up with some form of destabilisation continues, and the final two chapters, one on D.W. Winnicott’s transitional object, the other on Didier Anzieu’s concept of the ego skin, oscillate between the poles of healing and rupturing, my use of artists such as Marina Abramović and Lygia Clark enabling the discussion of the destabilising force of the death drive to be seen in socially productive terms as affecting change (Art and Psychoanalysis by Maria Walsh).
 
  • Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    My goodness! Maria Walsh may have something to say about Psychoanalysis, but don't rely on her for English style! Perhaps she meant:

    "I hope that my use of artists such as Marina Abramović and Lygia Clark as examples will help the reader to see that discussing the destabilising force of the death drive is in fact socially productive, since it affects change."

    Or perhaps she meant "effecting change"? Or something else entirely?
     

    Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    You're quite right, Ewie. There's a general principle (Ranganathan, perhaps?) that the more complex the ideas you're trying to get across, the simpler the language you should use. Some writers, especially on psychiatry and sociology, seem to delight in ignoring this principle. Walsh is one.
     
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