in someone's eyes/in someone's mind

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linlon

Senior Member
mandarin
Hi,
I am a little confused about the meanings of the two idioms:"in/to one's mind" and "in someone's eyes". I am not sure if they are the same meaning or not. For example:

1.'He is, in/to my mind, best suited for the job.'

2.'In her boss's eyes, Mary is a model employee.'

Are the two idioms the same meaning?

Thank you for your help.
 
  • maxiogee

    Banned
    English
    Hi,
    I am a little confused about the meanings of the two idioms:"in/to one's mind" and "in someone's eyes". I am not sure if they are the same meaning or not. For example:

    1.'He is, in/to my mind, best suited for the job.'

    2.'In her boss' eyes, Mary is a model employee.'

    Are the two idioms the same meaning?

    Thank you for your help.
    They are not quite the same. There is a degree of justification in the phrase "to my mind X is …" - the person who uses this phrase could, if asked, provide the reasons why they they think "X is …"

    The person who says "In her boss' eyes, Mary is a model employee" is either indicating that the boss is wrong and that there is something about Mary which the boss doesn't know, or that the boss is not setting high standards, or that the boss has to take what is available - maybe the boss has a guilty secret and Mary doesn't ask awkward questions. We don't know enough, but we do know that something in the relationship is not quite right.
     

    linlon

    Senior Member
    mandarin
    Hi,
    Thank you, moxiogee for your comment. I think I understand your explanation. Thank you for your help.
     

    gemzill

    New Member
    Come From: Britain/Hong Kong, Speak: English
    'In my mind, he would be perfect.'='My opinion is he would be perfect.'
    'In Jane's eyes, Mary was nice.'='To Jane, Mary seemed very nice.'

    They are slightly different in the terms of 'the mind' and 'the eyes'. 'in someone's mind' would be what someone thought, 'in someone's eyes' would be what they appear to be.
     

    tonko

    Senior Member
    Italian
    Hello
    So I am aware of the expression "in someone's eyes", and you all probably are aware of the expression "beauty is in the eye of the beholder", and there comes my question, can I say then "in your eye" as to express "in your mind" or instead "in your eyes"?

    Example:

    In your eye that is strange, I find it quite normal
    or it is better to say
    In your eyes

    Cheers

    p.s. Why it is so when I ask a question, maybe slightly related, in an already preexisting topic I never do get an answer? Should I open a new thread? I do not understand it? :(
     
    Last edited:

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    p.s. Why it is so when I ask a question, maybe slightly related, in an already preexisting topic I never do get an answer? Should I open a new thread? I do not understand it?
    You're doing the right thing by adding your question to an existing thread. If you have any problems getting a response just notify the moderators using the Report-A-Post button (as you did with this one).

    So I am aware of the expression "in someone's eyes", and you all probably are aware of the expression "beauty is in the eye of the beholder", and there comes my question, can I say then "in your eye" as to express "in your mind" or instead "in your eyes"?

    Example:

    In your eye that is strange, I find it quite normal
    or it is better to say
    In your eyes

    Cheers

    "In your eyes", to me, means "in your opinion" or "in your way of judging things". "To your eye" means "in the way you see/perceive things". "To your eye" is literal. "In your eyes" is figurative.

    For example:

    "To your eye it might be blue, but it's actually a dark tourquoise."

    "He might be a fool in your eyes, but he's still my husband and I won't have you talk about him that way."
     

    tonko

    Senior Member
    Italian
    Thanks a lot, even though I still have one question, about the expression "in your eye", to me it simply sounds clumsy?
    Does it mean also as "to your eye"?
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    I don't think I've ever heard "in your eye" as an expression, other than the silly drinking toast "Here's mud in your eye!" I don't think it's typically used in the singular in English.
     
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