In such heavy traffic, it is natural that Aaron is late.

8769

Senior Member
Japanese and Japan
My friends and I are trying to put a sentence in Japanese into English. The following are what we have made.
1. Due to the heavy traffic, we expect Aaron will be late.
2. In such heavy traffic, it is natural that Aaron is [should be / would be] late.

One of my friends and I agree that saying #1 is possible before Aaron appears. He insists, however, saying #2 is possible only after Aaron has appeared later than the appointed time. I think #2 is possible not only after Aaron has appeared later than the appointed time but also before Aaron appears.

Am I correct?
 
  • Fabulist

    Banned
    American English
    If Aaron was supposed or expected to arrive at 9:00, beginning at 9:01 he is late. At 8:59 (and earlier), it would also be possible (besides sentence #1) to say, "Due to the heavy traffic, we expect Aaron to be late." Once Aaron fails to arrive at the predicted or appointed time, we can say, "In such heavy traffic, it is natural for Aaron to be late." All three of the original posited variations of #2 are possible as soon as Aaron's expected or appointed arrival time passes without his having appeared. So you are correct and your friend is not.:)
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    My friends and I are trying to put a sentence in Japanese into English. The following are what we have made.
    1. Due to the heavy traffic, we expect Aaron will be late.
    2. In such heavy traffic, it is natural that Aaron is [should be / would be] late.

    One of my friends and I agree that saying #1 is possible before Aaron appears. He insists, however, saying #2 is possible only after Aaron has appeared later than the appointed time. I think #2 is possible not only after Aaron has appeared later than the appointed time but also before Aaron appears.

    Am I correct?
    I think that yes, you're correct: #2 could be said either before or after Aaron arrives.
     

    8769

    Senior Member
    Japanese and Japan
    Thank you, Fabulist.

    If Aaron was supposed or expected to arrive at 9:00, beginning at 9:01 he is late. At 8:59 (and earlier), it would also be possible (besides sentence #1) to say, "Due to the heavy traffic, we expect Aaron to be late." Once Aaron fails to arrive at the predicted or appointed time, we can say, "In such heavy traffic, it is natural for Aaron to be late." All three of the original posited variations of #2 are possible as soon as Aaron's expected or appointed arrival time passes without his having appeared. So you are correct and your friend is not.:)
    Judging from what you have written above, is what you really mean as follows?
    So your friend is correct and you are not.
     

    Fabulist

    Banned
    American English
    No. You (8769) wrote that your friend "insists [that] . . . #2 is possible only after Aaron has appeared later than the appointed time. I think #2 is possible not only after Aaron has appeared later than the appointed time but also before Aaron appears." We have two events and three time periods:

    Before appointment | Scheduled time | Between appointment and appearance | Aaron's arrival | After Aaron's arrival

    You may say that "is late" at any time after he was supposed to arrive, whether before or after his actual arrival. Again with a 9:00 appointment, at 9:01 you can say "Aaron is late." If he shows up at 10:00, you can say, "Here's Aaron; he's late again." Once some time has passed after Aaron's arrival, you would more likely say, "Aaron was late today." You would probably do this in describing the day's events to someone else, even on the same day. To Aaron himself, you would say, "You are late"—present tense. Obviously, you could not say this until at least a second or two after his arrival.
     
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