In the amount of [on account of]

Silver

Senior Member
Chinese,Cantonese,Sichuan dialect
Hi,

I got a term from my textbook, it is a business term, since my major is business English, but I am not sure whether it makes sense, I cannot check it out in the dictionary. The the is "in the amount of", means "for", please take a look at my self-made sentence to see whether it makes sense:


He travelled to the city in the amount of that strange girl he mentioned last time in the conversation.


Does it make sense?


Thanks
 
  • Miss Julie

    Senior Member
    English-U.S.
    Your sentence does not make sense. "Amount" means a sum or quantity, as in:

    A check in the amount of $25.00

    The amount of sugar needed for a recipe

    Now that you know this, how would you revise your sentence?
     

    Solohina

    Member
    russian
    I hope it's okay to continue posting in this thread, instead of creating a new one with a related inquiry.
    Miss Julie
    Regarding
    in the amount of
    It is often a matter of dispute with my colleagues.
    I have always been under the impression, that this phrase is mostly used by Russians, who think in their native language and translate Russian expressions word-by-word instead of finding an English equivalent (we call it "Runglish" :) ).
    So, I insisted several times on changing "a bonus/payment/fee in the amount of $100.00" to "a bonus/payment/fee of $100.00" However, now that I see you using this expression in your example, I think I was wrong.
    Does the expression "in the amount of" sound natural to a native speaker?
     

    Miss Julie

    Senior Member
    English-U.S.
    "a bonus/payment/fee in the amount of $100.00" to "a bonus/payment/fee of $100.00"

    Both are correct and sound natural to a native (AmE) speaker! :)

    "On account of" is just another way to say "because of" or "due to," as in this example:

    He decided not to drive to New York on account of the bad weather.
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    It's as Miss Julie says (message #6)--but it has just struck me that the confusion may have arisen because "account of" can also be used in a different way, in a business/financial sense.

    In writing a check, or in arranging an EFT (electronic funds transfer), we may speak of an amount of money payable to the account of--here meaning not "because of" but to be credited to the bank account of the named person or company.
     

    Miss Julie

    Senior Member
    English-U.S.
    It's as Miss Julie says (message #6)--but it has just struck me that the confusion may have arisen because "account of" can also be used in a different way, in a business/financial sense.

    In writing a check, or in arranging an EFT (electronic funds transfer), we may speak of an amount of money payable to the account of--here meaning not "because of" but to be credited to the bank account of the named person or company.
    Right, but the question was about the phrase "on account of," which carries a different meaning.
     
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