in the corridor or on the corridor?

< Previous | Next >

kevin_guy10

New Member
portuguese
Which preposition (adverb?) should be used with the word corridor? In or on? Or maybe both? Any examples?
 
  • e2efour

    Senior Member
    UK English
    Hi kevin_guy and welcome to the forum!

    It depends on what you mean by corridor and what the situation is. Can you give us a sentence where you want to use one of these prepositions?
     

    kevin_guy10

    New Member
    portuguese
    Thank you e2efour!

    I've got two sentences where I would like to use them: 'people were talking in/on the corridor' and 'the principal's office is on the second door to your left in/on the corridor upstairs'.
     

    e2efour

    Senior Member
    UK English
    I would use talking in the corridor.
    But I could use in or on for the location of the office. For example, we say that the door of someone's office opens onto the corridor, not into.
     

    e2efour

    Senior Member
    UK English
    Perhaps I should revise what I said in #4. We can say both "opens into" and "opens onto the corridor".
    Prepositions are difficult!
    But I would never say "there's a dog on the corridor".
     

    kevin_guy10

    New Member
    portuguese
    Is there any situation where you would definitely use 'on' the corridor, or is 'on' interchangeable with 'in' in most cases?
     

    e2efour

    Senior Member
    UK English
    If you're looking at or can see the corridor, I would say "in".
    Otherwise for a location, I would probably say "in the room on the corridor upstairs" (perhaps because the room is not really in the corridor). But the difference is not all that important.

    "Where's the principal's office?" "It's on the corridor below this one."
     

    Mister Owl

    New Member
    India-Hindi & English
    The principal's office is at the second door by the corridor.
    Is it right? Even i am a learner.Please correct me.
     

    Barbara Paola

    New Member
    Italian
    I have just read this sentence: “while I was running on the corridor suddenly I fell over”
    Is it correct that “on the corridor”?
     

    e2efour

    Senior Member
    UK English
    The principal's office is at the second door bydown/along the corridor.
    Is it right? Even i am a learner.Please correct me.
    Welcome to the English forum, Mister Owl! :)

    There is no need for a preposition before door. "The office is the second door" is enough.

    I have just read this sentence: “while I was running on the corridor suddenly I fell over”
    Is it correct that “on the corridor”?
    Welcome to the English forum, Barbara Paola! :)

    More than one preposition is possible before corridor.
    I would say While I was running down/along the corridor I suddenly fell over. (For some reason I would not say up the corridor.)
     
    Last edited:

    Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    We are talking about two quite different things:
    1. In the space between the two walls of the corridor = in the corridor. "Don't run in the corridor... He was standing in the corridor... Take care in that corridor, the floor is wet..."
    2. At a location behind one of the walls of the corridor = on the corridor. "The headmaster's office is on the upstairs corridor... He has a room on this corridor... I was looking for the lab on corridor B..."
     

    sound shift

    Senior Member
    English - England
    And yet in this thread (a double room with an en-suite bathroom ?) someone was talking about a bathroom in the corridor . . .

    I would use on myself, but what if it's at the end of the corridor?
    You're referring to this post:
    I don't know the right meaning of the two underlined parts in the sentence below. Is it possible to change the first part simply into a double room with a bathroom, and the second into was no room with a bathroom?

    I had booked a double room with an en-suite bathroom through the Internet, but there were no en-suite rooms available so I had to use the bathroom in the corridor.
    The sentence in bold seems borderline to me. I would prefer "down the corridor", assuming the person was considering the situation by reference to the room in which he/she was staying.
     
    Last edited:
    < Previous | Next >
    Top