'In the crowd were several recruits'

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Whyme

Member
Hungarian
In the crowd were several recruits who are regarded as excellent prospects for next year's team.

Although I occasionally come across these types of sentences (referring to the underlined part) in articles and grammar quizes, I never hear any of these in spoken English. My questions are:

- Is it because the adverb+verb+subject order is accepted only in written/literary English?
- Did the writer of this sentence want to put the emphasis on the adverb (In the crowd) instead of the verb or the subject and hence went for this word order?
- Is it OK to use suchlike in e.g. a school essay?

Thank you for your reply!
 
  • spirals

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I would say that is perfect English and not unusual. As I think you know, it could be written: "There were several recruits in the crowd who are regarded as excellent prospects for next year's team." The structure you underlined just gives some variety, and it's probably slightly more formal. It wouldn't sound completely out of place in spoken English though.
     

    Whyme

    Member
    Hungarian
    Yes, I know you could write "There were several recruits in the crowd" instead and actually that's why I was asking, as I had only heard it that way before, using 'there'.
     

    johndot

    Senior Member
    English - England
    This might simply be the writer’s usual style.
    This might be the style of the rest of the book or article.
    This might not be the style of the rest of the book or article, but the writer has chosen it for this paragraph or sentence in order to make a point.

    Only the author knows—unless the answer to the puzzle lies hidden between the pages!
     
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