in the first lines/in the beginning lines

Echo7

Senior Member
Persian
Suppose I'm writing a question for a passage

1. What is the writer's purpose in the first lines?
2. What is the writer's purpose in the beginning lines?

Which one is correct?
 
  • Echo7

    Senior Member
    Persian
    OK, there was a passage consisting of 4 paragraphs. I wrote few questions for the passage as my teacher asked us to.

    One of them was:
    What is the writer's purpose in the beginning lines?

    While checking my questions, she suggested that "in the first" suits better!
    I want to know why?!
    What is wrong with "in the beginning"?

    Off course, I asked her but she didn't say anything!

    I think both "in the first" and "in the beginning" have the same meaning.
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    Thank you ... that's just great. :)

    All right, personal opinion: I don't like either one very much, but if I were forced to choose, I would choose your version by a very narrow margin.

    Instead, I would use one of these:
    What is the writer's purpose in the beginning of the story?
    What is the writer's purpose in the very beginning of the story?
    What is the writer's purpose in the first few lines of the story?

    It's possible to leave "of the story" out if it seems to work better with what you've written before, if anything.

    Again, this is personal opinion -- other members will have other opinions ... just watch. :)
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    I wouldn't use "beginning lines" either - I'd use "opening lines" instead:).
     
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