in the greater cosmic scheme of the universal experience?

TrungstXVI

Senior Member
Vietnam
The Stoics acknowledged the existence of emotions as much as they acknowledge any other aspect of human existence; they merely argue that emotions should not be allowed to take center stage, so to speak, at the expense of rationality and logic, in the greater cosmic scheme of the universal experience.

[Stoicism: A Beginner's Guide to the History & Philosophy of Stoicism]

I don't understand the bold words. Could you explain it to me!?

Do it have the same meaning as "in the grand scheme of things"?

I think it means "when the universal experience is considered"

Thanks
 
  • dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    I agree: the two bold phrases have the same meaning. But I don't understand the expression in the book clearly, so I can't explain it.

    I didn't even know there was a "cosmic scheme of the universal experience"! Perhaps the Stoics believed there was one. If so, it may be explained somewhere else in the book.
     

    TrungstXVI

    Senior Member
    Vietnam
    I agree: the two bold phrases have the same meaning. But I don't understand the expression in the book clearly, so I can't explain it.

    I didn't even know there was a "cosmic scheme of the universal experience"! Perhaps the Stoics believed there was one. If so, it may be explained somewhere else in the book.
    I don't know why the author use "the universal experience" there. Could you help me out?
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    The phrase "universal experience" means "an experience that every person experiences". That is often what "universal" means: something every person in the world does or has.

    For example, you could say "Burping is universal."

    But I have no idea what the author is saying here. I talked about this in post #2:

    I didn't even know there was a "cosmic scheme of the universal experience"! Perhaps the Stoics believed there was one. If so, it may be explained somewhere else in the book.
    Maybe someone else will see this thread, who understands.
     
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