in the late-December/in late-December/in late December's/ in the late December's

Gabriel Malheiros

Senior Member
Portuguese - Brazil
Hello, guys

If I want to talk about a party that took place in late December, should I use 's and?

I mean, which one is correct?

"I met her in the late-December party"
"I met her in late-December party
"I met her in late December's party"
"I met her in the late December's party"



Thank you!
 
Last edited:
  • Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    Following your construction: I met her at a late-December party.

    You meet at a party, not in a party.
    The party was in late December, so you need to hyphenate "late-December" to turn it into a two-word adjective.
    And "party" requires an article, i.e. "a party."
     

    Gabriel Malheiros

    Senior Member
    Portuguese - Brazil
    Following your construction: I met her at a late-December party.

    You meet at a party, not in a party.
    The party was in late December, so you need to hyphenate "late-December" to turn it into a two-word adjective.
    And "party" requires an article, i.e. "a party."
    What if I want to talk about a particular party, the party that took place in late December. Could I use 's? I mean: I met her at late December's party or I met her at the late December's party"???
     

    london calling

    Senior Member
    UK English
    What if I want to talk about a particular party, the party that took place in late December. Could I use 's? I mean: I met her at late December's party or I met her at the late December's party"???
    No, Gab. I'd say "I met her at the party in late December" to talk about a particular party or, as Copy says, "I met her at the late-December party".
     

    spilorrific

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Your example would only work if there were parties at very regular intervals. That is, you met her at late December's party, as opposed to early December's party. This scenario is not impossible, but it's quite improbable.

    I'm sorry, but at this very minute, I can't formulate a rule to help you know why the 's does not work for your example but it DOES work for the examples Copyright gave you. I could tell you that "it's just the way it is" but I know that you want a precise reason.

    By the way, Friday's only has one "s" (it's not "Fridays's").

    One sometimes sees this use of an apostrophe after a month in a more poetic realm: Cold December's winds cut through my coat and I shivered uncontrollably.
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    then what is wrong with "I met her at late December's party"?
    The answer is the same as with many of your "why?" questions, i.e. "It's not said that way in English."

    Unfortunately, learners of our language are misled into thinking that there's some sort of so-called "rule" to cover a situation that is best answered by "It's not English."

    Moreover, learners of English often ignore the fact that the same situation exists in their native language.

    Since I'm struggling with Brazilian Portuguese, I'll point out that the use of "bigger" is different in Portugal than it is in Brazil. I don't badger the instructor as to "why?" I just accept it as an idiomatic difference and learn it as such.

    The ultimate answer and one that supersedes any and all so-called rules that people come up with is that "we don't say it that way."

    Sometimes, this distresses learners who have been misled into believing that everything in English can be explained in some logical manner.

    When I was taking German in high school (secondary school) I had an excellent teacher who answered all such questions by saying,"Big Germans say it that way and their little Germans hear it and say it the same way and then the little Germans grow up to be big Germans who have little Germans, who hear them saying things that way and say it the same way and then those little Germans grow up to be big Germans ... "

    So it is in English and, more than likely, precisely the same in the native language of the bewildered learner, who never thinks about it because it all was learned idiomatically, i.e., "naturally."

    I suggest you take a caipirinha and relax. :)
     
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