(in) the rest of the year

LQZ

Senior Member
Mandarin
“It’s not good for the environment, and it’s not good for the tourist sector, which has to invest all this money for a few weeks of craziness and then is relatively idle the rest of the year,” he said. ---taken from the NYT

Dear all,

Should it be "in the rest of the year"? Thanks.


LQZ
 
  • ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    In the rest of the year would be extremely unlikely, LQZ. For the rest of the year would work well. But it's not necessary to have a preposition there.
     

    Cinderella Girl

    New Member
    Polish
    idle is an adjective here so the answer is NO. The same you can say 'idle year' the difference is that this is an idle rest of the year. I don't think 'the' before 'rest of the year' is needed here.

    :) xx
     

    LQZ

    Senior Member
    Mandarin
    Thank you, ewie and Cinderella. :)

    To ewie, do you also think "the" in "the rest of the year" is redundant?
     

    Cinderella Girl

    New Member
    Polish
    'For THE rest of the year' ('the' is needed here) BUT 'a relatively idle rest of the year'.

    we don't say: 'have a great the rest of the year' but we do say 'have a great rest of the year' - I think the same is with idle - both with great are adjectives. I'm not sure on that now, though. Ewie?
     
    Last edited:

    dn88

    Senior Member
    Polish
    @Cinderella Girl: But the adjective "idle" describes the tourist sector, not the rest of the year.
     

    Cinderella Girl

    New Member
    Polish
    @Cinderella Girl: But the adjective "idle" describes the tourist sector, not the rest of the year.
    If 'idle' describes the tourist sector and not the rest of the year, then this sentence with the-rest-of-the-year-ending doesn't make any sense to me.
     

    LQZ

    Senior Member
    Mandarin
    @Cinderella Girl: But the adjective "idle" describes the tourist sector, not the rest of the year.
    To Cinderella, I agree with dn88.

    The subject of "is idle" is the tourist sector and "the rest of the year" functions as an adverbial of time.
     

    Cinderella Girl

    New Member
    Polish
    I've read the sentence again - carefully! I can see you point now :) I didn't understand it at first. I think that the sentence: '“It’s not good for the environment, and it’s not good for the tourist sector, which has to invest all this money for a few weeks of craziness and then is relatively idle the rest of the year,” is correct now. I agree with Ewie who wrote that we could use 'for' here but it would be just another (also correct) way of saying this.

    Sorry for the mess I've made :)
     

    LQZ

    Senior Member
    Mandarin
    I've read the sentence again - carefully! I can see you point now :) I didn't understand it at first. I think that the sentence: '“It’s not good for the environment, and it’s not good for the tourist sector, which has to invest all this money for a few weeks of craziness and then is relatively idle the rest of the year,” is correct now. I agree with Ewie who wrote that we could use 'for' here but it would be just another (also correct) way of saying this.

    Sorry for the mess I've made :)
    Thank you for your contribution from me. :)
     

    LQZ

    Senior Member
    Mandarin
    Dear all,

    I am back with a new question. :)

    Just now ewie said: in the rest of the year would be extremely unlikely, LQZ. For the rest of the year would work well. But it's not necessary to have a preposition there.

    However while reading another news item, I ran into the following.

    Despite uncertainties on growth in global demand, we expect China to rely on continued investment in ongoing infrastructure projects and resilient consumption to grow by around 9 per cent in the rest of the year and 2011.
    Either in is used or the preposition is not moitted. Could you please explain to me why? Thanks.


    LQZ
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    “It’s not good for the environment, and it’s not good for the tourist sector, which has to invest all this money for a few weeks of craziness and then is relatively idle the rest of the year,” he said. ---taken from the NYT

    Should it be "in the rest of the year"?
    No preposition is necessary; the sentence is correct the way it stands. But the person who is quoted could have used one, had he wished to do so. It would not be "in"; it would be for.


     

    LQZ

    Senior Member
    Mandarin
    No preposition is necessary; the sentence is correct the way it stands. But the person who is quoted could have used one, had he wished to do so. It would not be "in"; it would be for.


    Thanks, I've got it. :)
     
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