*in* the same respect vs *at* the same respect

elliest_5

Senior Member
UK
Greek
I am writing a report of measuring a certain value for three different types of things and this is the initial hypothesis:

" A is expected to have a similar range of degrees of value x as B, given the similarity of...( blah blah), and, in the same respect, A is expected to differ from C as much B does."

By "in the same respect" I mean "as far as as value x is concerned". Would it make sense and convey the meaning I want if I used it here?

It also dawned on me that we sometimes say "at the same respect" and google didn't return significantly different frequencies. Could you tell me where we use "in" , where "at" and what their possible meanings are?

Thanks in advance
 
  • Tazzler

    Senior Member
    American English
    "at the same respect" sounds weird to me, period. I don't think it's correct. Even if the results Google collected are by native speakers, I'm sure if they proofread their writing they would have changed it to "in."

    I tend to shy away from anything that has variables in it, so let's wait for other people to give their opinions.
     
    Last edited:

    brunaa

    Senior Member
    Portuguese(BR)- English(US) bilingual
    I am writing a report of measuring a certain value for three different types of things and this is the initial hypothesis:

    " A is expected to have a similar range of degrees of value x as B, given the similarity of...( blah blah), and, in the same respect, A is expected to differ from C as much as B does."

    By "in the same respect" I mean "as far as as value x is concerned". Would it make sense and convey the meaning I want if I used it here?

    It also dawned on me that we sometimes say "at the same respect" and google didn't return significantly different frequencies. Could you tell me where we use "in" , where "at" and what their possible meanings are?

    Thanks in advance

    I'm not quite sure, but I believe an 'as' is required there.;)

    To me, in the same respect sounds fine, but let's wait for more natives replies!
     

    JustKate

    Senior Member
    I agree, Tazzler - the idiom is in the same respect (meaning "in the same way"), and that's that. I googled both, too, and while there were definitely some places in which "at the same respect" was used where I'd use "in the same respect," some of the hits weren't using it as an idiom - they just happend to use those four words in that same order but with an entirely different meaning. For example, I found several that referenced "at the same respect and discipline" and a couple that had constructions such as "at the same, respect for privacy."
     
    Top