in the silence of the windy wood, for trees make a silence even in their noise of wind

longxianchen

Senior Member
chinese
Hi,
Here are some words from the novel Lady Chatterley's Lover(para. 23) by Lawrence(the University of Adelaide,here):

She walked on, listening. And then she noticed a narrow track between young fir-trees, a track that seemed to lead nowhere. But she felt it had been used. She turned down it adventurously, between the thick young firs, which gave way soon to the old oak wood. She followed the track, and the hammering grew nearer, in the silence of the windy wood, for trees make a silence even in their noise of wind.

Please notice the words in red:
Since that the wood is windy, how can it be in silence? And since the trees "in their noise of wind", how can the trees make (meaning "form" I feel) silence?

Could you please give me some explanations?
Thank you in advance
 
Last edited:
  • BLUEGLAZE

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    The wind in the trees is background noise. It is normal. So, the silence was broken by the hammering which is an introduced sound.
     

    Sparky Malarky

    Moderator
    English - US
    Trees block the noise of the city, or of farming, or of whatever there is. If you stand out on a bare plane, small sounds will carry a long way but in the woods those sounds are blocked by the trees. Therefore, trees "make silence," although they also make noise themselves when the wind blows through them.
     
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