In the stock market, as in your favorite department store

atakeris

Senior Member
Latvian
Hello,

In the stock market, as in your favorite department store, it's always wisest to purchase when the merchandise is getting marked down.

Why it's used "as" instead of "like"? It's not followed by any clause with a verb. Would it be grammatically correct to use "like" here?
 
  • perpend

    Banned
    American English
    "like" seems understandable to me, but I prefer "as" for a more formal text.

    In other words---"like" is also correct for me.
     

    atakeris

    Senior Member
    Latvian
    "like" seems understandable to me, but I prefer "as" for a more formal text.

    In other words---"like" is also correct for me.
    Ok, so how to know when to choose "as" and "like"? I thought the best rule was to choose "as" then it's followed by a clause with a verb and choose "like" when it's without a verb.
     

    perpend

    Banned
    American English
    I couldn't consider that a hard and fast rule.

    Just to make sure we are on the same page.

    Here's the clause with the verb:
    A) ... it's always wisest to purchase when the merchandise is getting marked down.

    The beginning sets up a comparison between the stock market and your favorite department store.

    In the stock market
    In your favorite department store

    I could use both "as in" or "like in" to make the comparison. I fear I may not be addressing your issue.
     

    perpend

    Banned
    American English
    I used to watch way too much of MSNBC and Jim Kramer.

    He talks like that about stocks in the stock market: mark-downs

    It's not that much different that a retail store, when it comes down to it.
     
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