in the way only an elite athlete can

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ironman2012

Senior Member
Chinese
Hi,

He passes the racket to me – it is light and not highly strung, which could also be said of the man. We are in a vast warehouse in Zurich, Switzerland, and I’m swinging away with the racket and imaginary balls. He looks lean, tanned, glowing, in the way only an elite athlete can.

(This comes from theguardian.com Roger Federer: ‘I need the fire, the excitement, the whole rollercoaster’ by Simon Hattenstone on 18 Jun 2016.)

Is "look lean, tanned, glowing" elided after the blue part, that is, in the way only an elite athlete can look lean, tanned, glowing? I'm not sure.

Thanks in advance!
 
  • owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    I'm not omitting "leaned, tan, and glowing". There isn't any need to omit it because it comes earlier in the sentence. The only word that is omitted after "can" will be either "do" or "look" in that sentence. Those words make sense after "as only an elite athlete can."
     

    ironman2012

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    Sorry, may I ask this way:
    in the way that only an elite athlete can do/look ---> look what? Look lean, tanned, glowing, rather than pretty etc.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    He looks lean, tanned, glowing, in the way only an elite athlete can.

    I think what he is saying is that other people can look lean, tanned and glowing but only an elite athlete can look lean, tanned and glowing in that exact way. They have a little something extra that makes them stand out, even among other people who are lean, tanned and glowing.
     
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