In+ verb ing

gothicpartner

Senior Member
Spanish
Hello,

Could you explain to me when I could use this grammatical structure?

I can only get that "verb -ing" forms can be used as a gerund ( noun) or as a verb ( progressive tense) for these cases.

I can just remember these two examples:

You are correct in thinking that = Tienes razón al pensar eso (verb) or tienes razón en pensamiento de eso ( noun) ???

She tripped in racing for the bus.= Se tropezó al correr por el bus (verb) or Se tropezó en/durante la carrera por el bus (noun) ??

Some other examples will be also helpful.
Thanks in advance!
Regards
 
  • FromPA

    Senior Member
    USA English
    The object of a proposition has to be a noun. In English, the "ing" form of the verb can function as a noun (a gerund). A noun answers the question "who?" or "what?". Your first sentence can be analyzed as follows: Your are correct in (about) what? (About what are you correct?). The answer to the question is, "thinking that...".

    The second sentence is a little trickier because "in racing" actually means "while racing," which I believe is an adverbial phrase (answering the question "when?") rather than a prepositional phrase. I'm not certain of the grammatical explanation, but I am certain that the "ing" verbal is correct). "While racing" is an abbreviated way of saying "while I was racing/while you were racing/etc" (while + pronoun + past progressive tense). My amateur interpretation is that you could think of "racing" as an abbreviated reference to the past progressive tense rather than a gerund. I'm sure we'll hear a more technical explanation from the professional grammarians in the forum.
     
    Last edited:

    SevenDays

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    Hello,

    Could you explain to me when I could use this grammatical structure?

    I can only get that "verb -ing" forms can be used as a gerund ( noun) or as a verb ( progressive tense) for these cases.

    I can just remember these two examples:

    You are correct in thinking that = Tienes razón al pensar eso (verb) or tienes razón en pensamiento de eso ( noun) ???

    She tripped in racing for the bus.= Se tropezó al correr por el bus (verb) or Se tropezó en/durante la carrera por el bus (noun) ??

    Some other examples will be also helpful.
    Thanks in advance!
    Regards
    Hello

    I suppose that as part of an introductory prepositional phrase, this construction is grammatically correct and idiomatic:

    In keeping with our schedule, I will now discuss the health benefits of alcachofas.

    Sometimes "in" has the meaning of "by":
    In coming to your defense, I expect to be paid handsomely. (By coming to your defense....)

    I think "be interested in + gerund" also works:
    I am interested in making alcachofas out of tofu.
    He is interested in knowing the secret of life.

    By the way, I'm not sure I would call pensar in "Tienes razón al pensar eso" a verb; I think it's a verbal (infinitive) that functions as a noun, so you don't need to use (and you really shouldn't use) pensamiento.

    Cheers
     
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