In versus from

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Julienjing1

Senior Member
Chinese
Sentence: I saw this line from/in a movie.

Hello, everyone. I find 'in' also workable here. And it makes me wonder if 'from' works here, and I think we have 'I saw it from childhood', 'I learned this from textbook' etc. So I'm wondering which one fits better. Thank you.
 
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  • Julienjing1

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    'In versus from' makes no sense in English as it stands.

    Can you please give us your source and quote the complete sentence in which the expression appears?
    I wrote this sentence when I was quoting a line I saw in a movie. So I said 'I saw this line from a movie'.
     

    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    Yes, "in" is what you want if you were watching the movie and, in that movie, you heard that line spoken (or saw it in the subtitles).
    In a different context, "from" is possible, if you are talking about a line that has been taken or quoted from a movie.
    I heard this line from a movie spoken by my friend.
     

    Julienjing1

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    Yes, "in" is what you want if you were watching the movie and, in that movie, you heard that line spoken (or saw it in the subtitles).
    In a different context, "from" is possible, if you are talking about a line that has been taken or quoted from a movie.
    I heard this line from a movie spoken by my friend.
    Thank you. Can I say 'I saw it from my childhood'?
    'I learned it from my high school textbook.'? Or I have to use 'in'.

    'I saw it in my childhood'.
    'I learned it in my high school textbook.'
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    Thank you. Can I say 'I saw it from my childhood'?
    'I learned it from my high school textbook.'? Or I have to use 'in'.

    In
    = inside, within (and sometimes 'into')
    In can be
    in a place: I found it in the garden -> in = inside the boundaries of the garden.
    In a time: I will tell you in an hour -> in = within the time of an hour

    From is a preposition. It has two forms
    1.
    it describes the the origin of something by describing
    (i) the place from which something came or "He comes from China." / "We buy food from a shop."
    (ii) the substance from which something came; "I made this from a piece of wood."
    (iii) The time from which something came "This vase is very old. It comes from the 13th century."

    Can I say 'I saw it from my childhood'?
    Yes, you can but it does not mean what you think it means. It means
    I have seen this many times, the first time I saw it was in my childhood.
     

    Julienjing1

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    In = inside, within (and sometimes 'into')
    In can be
    in a place: I found it in the garden -> in = inside the boundaries of the garden.
    In a time: I will tell you in an hour -> in = within the time of an hour

    From is a preposition. It has two forms
    1.
    it describes the the origin of something by describing
    (i) the place from which something came or "He comes from China." / "We buy food from a shop."
    (ii) the substance from which something came; "I made this from a piece of wood."
    (iii) The time from which something came "This vase is very old. It comes from the 13th century."

    Yes, you can but it does not mean what you think it means. It means
    I have seen this many times, the first time I saw it was in my childhood.
    I have never heard that 'from' could mean that in certain context. Thank you.

    If I say 'he is my friend that I met from high school'. Does it mean 'I still meet him quite often after graduating from high school'?
     

    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    If I say 'he is my friend that I met from high school'. Does it mean 'I still meet him quite often after graduating from high school'?
    No. It can't mean that because "met" is past tense. Also we usually don't use "that" to refer to people; we use "who(m)" instead.

    He is my friend from high school. --> This means you became friends when you were both in high school.
    He is my friend {whom} I met in high school. --> Similar meaning: you became acquainted (you met) in high school.

    By the way: The verb "meet" has different meanings. It often means "get to know", or meet for the first time. It also means to have a meeting.

    If you want to say that you still get together often, the best way is to use two separate sentences, or a sentence with two parts joined by "and".
    He is my friend from high school, and we still meet for coffee at least once a month.
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    If I say 'he is my friend that I met from high school'. Does it mean 'I still meet him quite often after graduating from high school'?
    No. Also, you are confusing the use of "highschool" which is a place with "childhood" which is a time.
     

    Julienjing1

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    No. It can't mean that because "met" is past tense. Also we usually don't use "that" to refer to people; we use "who(m)" instead.

    He is my friend from high school. --> This means you became friends when you were both in high school.
    He is my friend {whom} I met in high school. --> Similar meaning: you became acquainted (you met) in high school.

    By the way: The verb "meet" has different meanings. It often means "get to know", or meet for the first time. It also means to have a meeting.

    If you want to say that you still get together often, the best way is to use two separate sentences, or a sentence with two parts joined by "and".
    He is my friend from high school, and we still meet for coffee at least once a month.
    So 'he is a friend whom I met in high school', 'he is my friend from high school, and 'he is a friend whom I met from high school.'

    Do they mean basically the same thing ?

    The reason I wrote what I wrote on #9 was because Paul said that 'I saw it from childhood' means 'I have seen this many times, the first time I saw it was in my childhood.'

    So I was comparing. Obviously, 'I saw it from childhood' and 'he is my friend I met from high school' are incomparable.
     
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