In view/light of the weather

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quietdandelion

Banned
Formosa/Chinese
In light/view of the weather, we will cancel the outing.


Do both light and view work in the above and mean about the same?
On top of that, which is closer in meaning to outing, trip, journey, excursion, or jaunt? Thanks.
 
  • SwissPete

    Senior Member
    Français (CH), AE (California)
    In my view :) ,

    Light and view have the same meaning in this context. I would prefer view. You could also say "Considering the weather...".

    Outing and excursion are close. Outing could also be a picnic, a visit to a museum.
     

    Ke rico

    Member
    America - Spanish
    In English people say "in light of" as another form of saying "because of". "In light of the weather, the game was canceled".

    To me, "in view of the weather, the game was canceled" just does not make sence. I know that my English is sometimes flawed, but I am pretty sure "in view of the weather" wouldn't be correct to most people. "In light of" anything is another way of saying "because of". "Because of the weather, the game was canceled.
     

    nichec

    Senior Member
    Chinese(Taiwan)/English(AE)
    In English people say "in light of" as another form of saying "because of". "In light of the weather, the game was canceled".

    To me, "in view of the weather, the game was canceled" just does not make sence. I know that my English is sometimes flawed, but I am pretty sure "in view of the weather" wouldn't be correct to most people. "In light of" anything is another way of saying "because of". "Because of the weather, the game was canceled.
    I will second this with my "imperfect English" :D
     

    quietdandelion

    Banned
    Formosa/Chinese
    How dare you question my judgement :mad: :D

    Dictionary.com

    42.in (the) light of, taking into account; because of; considering: It was necessary to review the decision in the light of recent developments.

    http://dictionary.cambridge.org/define.asp?key=46071&dict=CALD
    Thanks, nichec, for your reply and the link.
    In truth, I dare not question your English instinct. But it's my curiosity that overwhlems me--what about the in view of part? You haven't defined and illustrated it.
     

    Flash3

    Senior Member
    United States and American English
    I think I've heard "In view of" maybe once or twice in my life. It's not really used by youth at all. I think it might become a stale expression if it already hasn't become one.
     

    Ke rico

    Member
    America - Spanish
    Quietdandelion, you should not doubt your skills with English. Of what I have seen, you speak English very good. You should give yourself more credit for your knowledge. English is a very dificult language to learn, and you are doing very nice.

    As about the subject of the thread, I guess "in view of" can be correct to, but you don't hear it as often. More often you will hear a person say, "Well the game was supposed to be today, but in light of the weather, it had to be canceled"

    Or something like, "We could have taken the subway, but in light of the construction, it would be faster to drive". I hope this example helps :D
     
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