In which way do you pronounce θ and ð?

How do you pronouce θ and ð?

  • your tongue almost touching the inner side of your upper teeth

    Votes: 3 20.0%
  • interdental; protrude your tongue between the upper and lower teeth

    Votes: 12 80.0%

  • Total voters
    15

cheshire

Senior Member
Catholic (Cat-holic, not Catholic)
In which way do you pronounce θ and ð?

(1) placing lightly your tongue on the inner side of the upper tongue, and fricate. In other words, your tongue isn't protruding.

(2) interdental fricative (your tongue between the upper and lower teeth, protruding)
 
  • panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Way up at the top of the English Only Forum is a sticky thread:
    < < BEFORE starting a new thread.......PLEASE READ > >

    It includes links to a number of sides that tell you how to include symbols from the International Phonetic Alphabet in posts:
    3. International Phonetic Alphabet - IPA.
    There are many different ways to use the IPA symbols within your posts.
    Some of these are listed HERE
    .
     

    Yôn

    Senior Member
    English
    To be honest, I can't even get a sound out when doing it the first way. Perhaps someone could explain to me how that works. :(



    Jon
     

    jous

    New Member
    sweden, swedish
    In which way do you pronounce θ and ð?

    (1) placing lightly your tongue on the inner side of the upper tongue teeth and fricate. In other words, your tongue isn't protruding.

    (2) interdental fricative (your tongue between the upper and lower teeth, protruding)
    Jon: say 'thing'. :)

    But actually I find the poll question sort of odd, because both sounds can be produced both ways. Or I'm missing something. I mean, the difference is just that the ð is voiced while the θ is voiceless, right?
     

    I_like_my_TV

    Senior Member
    Tongan
    But actually I find the poll question sort of odd, because both sounds can be produced both ways. Or I'm missing something. I mean, the difference is just that the ð is voiced while the θ is voiceless, right?
    The OP knows that both sounds (θ and ð) are produced the same way, and he asks which way you produce them: (1) or (2).
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    To avoid further confusion, please note that this thread is about the pronunciation of the sounds represented by the International Phonetic Alphabet symbols θ and ð. It is not asking how you pronounce the names of the symbols.
     

    AWordLover

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Hi All,

    I wish the poll had a third choice, that indicated I make those sounds both ways (although not simultaneously).

    EDIT: I've chosen to answer the poll with the method I think I use most often.
     

    Outsider

    Senior Member
    Portuguese (Portugal)
    (1) placing lightly your tongue on the inner side of the upper tongue, and fricate. In other words, your tongue isn't protruding.

    (2) interdental fricative (your tongue between the upper and lower teeth, protruding)
    I think my tongue curbs a bit more upwards when I pronounce the voiced "th", and stays more horizontal when I pronounce the voiceless one. I'm afraid I'm still not sure about what you're asking. Obviously, I don't stick out my tongue to pronounce either of those sounds (like this: :p), if that's what you mean by "protrude". But if someone is looking at me when I say them, they'll probably see my tongue behind my teeth.
    I hope this answers your question.
     

    LV4-26

    Senior Member
    Cheshire, I take it you meant "the upper teeth" in your opening post (in accordance with the first option in the poll), not "the upper tongue". In which case, it might be worth editing your post.

    I didn't vote because I think it's better to have only natives participate.
    I go for (2) but would like to add that the tongue is only very slightly protruding, if at all.
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    I pronounce both sounds with the tip of my tongue slightly past my upper front teeth. Someone looking at me would probably be able to see just the tip of my tongue peeking out between my teeth.
     

    Genecks

    Senior Member
    American English
    Supposedly, when a person pronounces "th," you're suppose to put your tounge between the teeth. Doing so makes sure you pronounce "th."

    I never cared to do this in the English language. I do it the other way.
     

    cheshire

    Senior Member
    Catholic (Cat-holic, not Catholic)
    In which way do you pronounce θ and ð?

    (1) placing lightly your tongue on the inner side of the upper tongueteeth, and fricate. In other words, your tongue isn't protruding.

    (2) interdental fricative (your tongue between the upper and lower teeth, protruding)
    I'm sorry for my stupid mistake! Two days passed, I couldn't edit it. I'm so sorry!
    I think it really depends on the word and how quickly I'm speaking.
    Got it!

    Supposedly, when a person pronounces "th," you're suppose to put your tounge between the teeth. Doing so makes sure you pronounce "th."

    I never cared to do this in the English language. I do it the other way.
    That's what I thought most natives would pronounce in their daily lives when I started this thread. I don't remember seeing natives actually protruding their tongues while I watch US dramas and comedies. Since it was pointed out by Outsider that I'm not clear as to the meaning of "protrude," I have to clarify my intention. When I used the word "protrude," I wanted it to mean whether your tongue stickes out past the extended line from upperteeth or lower teeth. The confusion seems to lie in that both versions (1) and (2) have one's tongue "protruded." But I meant your tongue is not "protruded" in (1), as it is still with the area of mouth cavity. I should have given more description.
    I pronounce both sounds with the tip of my tongue slightly past my upper front teeth. Someone looking at me would probably be able to see just the tip of my tongue peeking out between my teeth.
    Your way (2) seems to be the majority thanks to this poll, contrary to my anticipation. Thanks everyone for contribution.

    LV4-26, you may not be native, but your posts are often more helpful than natives!

    panjy and benjy and others: thanks for navigating this ship!
    I forgot that IPA symbols are not known very much except among linguistics lovers. In Japan, an average English learner knows all the IPA symbols representing English sounds, because they are used in E-J dictionaries.
     
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