In you, there isn't anything of what I hate in people

Ptak

Senior Member
Rußland
Is there a better way to say:
In you, there isn't anything of what I hate in people.

Maybe:
"In you, there's none of the things I hate"
is better?

Or another variant?
Thanks!
 
  • Ptak

    Senior Member
    Rußland
    There's nothing about you that I hate. (perhaps)
    Hm.... But doesn't that mean ~"I like everything about you" ?...
    The meaning that I'm looking for is ~"There are many things I don't like (I hate) in (other) people (arrogance, pretense, avidity, whatever). But I don't see them in you. / They don't exist in you".
     

    branchsnapper

    Member
    English - South England
    For the first one you probably need to say "other people" unless you are talking to a dog or alien. Apart from that I wouldn't class either as wrong, but the GWB example is much more natural, everyday English.
     
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