in your face

JuriTerreni

Senior Member
Chinese-China
From TV series<Making a Murderer>,


The kind of injuries she had to her upper body could only be done if someone's basically in your face. So it was very personal.

I want to know does this "in your face" mean marked by or done in a bold, defiant, or aggressive manner, or does it mean that someone's face to face with you?
Thank you.
 
  • Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    This previous thread should do it:
    in your face

    It means confrontational, but in a medical/physical sense, the person has to be face to face, in close proximity. So both, I would say.
     

    perpend

    Banned
    American English
    "in your face" in your context, Juri, means violating one's personal space, to me.
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    US English
    he kind of injuries she had to her upper body could only be done if someone's basically in your face. So it was very personal.

    "injuries that could only be cause by someone extremely physically close" is meant here. "basically in your face" meaning only inches away.

    other places "in your face" describes emotional interactions more than physical, but not here.
     

    JuriTerreni

    Senior Member
    Chinese-China
    This previous thread should do it:
    in your face

    It means confrontational, but in a medical/physical sense, the person has to be face to face, in close proximity. So both, I would say.
    I visited that thread, but it didn't say if it could mean face to face, so I started a new one..
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    As I said: both.

    The kind of injuries she had to her upper body could only be done if someone's basically in your face.

    You have to be close enough to a person for them to inflict injuries to your upper body, and you would probably have to be confrontational for them to attack you.
     
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