inciso

aimee_vv

Member
English, U.K.
hi

can anyone tell me what an 'inciso' is in the context of a pop song? Is it the chorus, bar, verse, bridge, line, something like that? I can't find it in any dictionary!

Thanks!
 
  • pinturicchio07

    Senior Member
    English, U.S.
    hi

    can anyone tell me what an 'inciso' is in the context of a pop song? Is it the chorus, bar, verse, bridge, line, something like that? I can't find it in any dictionary!

    Thanks!

    More context would be helpful. Do you have the line of the song?

    Lorenzo
     

    Parergon

    Senior Member
    Italiano, Italia
    Incidere for a music label, might mean "to record (and release) and album for them".


    Alternatively, according to Garzanti, this is how "incidere" can be translated:
    inciso
    Traduzione agg.
    1 incised
    2 (arte) engraved
    3 (impresso) engraved, impressed: un'immagine incisa nella memoria, an image engraved in one's memory ♦ s.m. (gramm.) parenthetic clause / per -, (incidentalmente) incidentally (o in passing).

    Ps. Providing more context, you will be more likely to receive a useful answer/comment.
     

    aimee_vv

    Member
    English, U.K.
    hi again,

    the whole sentence is:

    I due uomini aspettano in piedi la fine dell’inciso poi si avvicinano alla poltrona


    They are watching a guy play the song on his guitar. What would inciso be in this context? I like the idea of 'strophe' but it doesn't sound quite natural in English - any other suggestions that are a little more common in everyday usage?
     

    Ale The Nut

    Member
    Italian, Milan (Italy)
    hi again,

    the whole sentence is:

    I due uomini aspettano in piedi la fine dell’inciso poi si avvicinano alla poltrona


    They are watching a guy play the song on his guitar. What would inciso be in this context? I like the idea of 'strophe' but it doesn't sound quite natural in English - any other suggestions that are a little more common in everyday usage?

    In questo contesto, "inciso" è sinonimo di "motivo" (musicale). Lo tradurrei quindi con motif.

    Ciao!
     

    aimee_vv

    Member
    English, U.K.
    is that the part of the song that is repeated most frequently? the more common term for that in English is 'chorus' - could someone confirm this for me? cheers!
     

    pinturicchio07

    Senior Member
    English, U.S.
    is that the part of the song that is repeated most frequently? the more common term for that in English is 'chorus' - could someone confirm this for me? cheers!

    I don't think so - because "chorus" in Italian is ritornello...I could be wrong though.

    Lorenzo
     

    Ale The Nut

    Member
    Italian, Milan (Italy)
    Errata corrige. Ora ho capito.
    L'inciso è una parte del brano musicale, prevalentemente strumentale.
    La sequenza di solito è: strofa - ritornello - strofa - ritornello - inciso - ritornello.
    In inglese: strophe - chorus - strophe - chorus - solo - chorus.

    La traduzione che quindi cerchiamo è solo.

    Ciao
     

    Parergon

    Senior Member
    Italiano, Italia
    Correggendo la mia precedente affermazione confermo e sottoscrivo quanto dice Ale.

    Garzanti suggerisce questa definizione:

    2 (mus.) spunto melodico-ritmico che costituisce il nucleo fondamentale di una composizione.
     

    Carthusian cat

    Senior Member
    Italian
    Strophe? Non capisco questa parola...

    Generally a song or a poem is divided in stophes, and a strophe is divided in lines or verses, for example:

    You say you want
    diamons on a ring of gold -------strophe (4 verses)
    you say you want
    your story to remain untold

    ..
    Ale and Perergon are right, but in every strophe there is also an inciso, because we have to disinguish words from music. An inciso can either go with the words or be instrumental only, while isn't a solo equivalent to Italian assolo, and therefore only instrumental?

    I think inciso is the musical equivalent to strophe. So a part, not the whole motif.
    In English?
     

    pinturicchio07

    Senior Member
    English, U.S.
    Generally a song or a poem is divided in stophes, and a strophe is divided in lines or verses, for example:

    You say you want
    diamons on a ring of gold -------strophe (4 verses)
    you say you want
    your story to remain untold


    Ale and Perergon are right, but in every strophe there is also an inciso, because we have to disinguish words from music. An inciso can either go with the words or be instrumental only, while isn't a solo equivalent to Italian assolo, and therefore only instrumental?

    I think inciso is the musical equivalent to strophe. So a part, not the whole motif.
    In English?

    Grazie 1000 Carthusian - ho dimenticato di "strophe"! Ora, ricordo!

    Lorenzo
     

    Lariana

    Senior Member
    Italy - bilingual French/Italian
    The inciso is, by definition, a part of something that is framed by two parts identical in structure. In a text, we do say 'incidental phrase", meaning a phrase within parentheses, em-dashes or commas.

    For example:

    I was going down the road (the road leading to Newcastle), when I saw Mrs. Brown, whom I never salute, waving.

    There are two 'incisi' in the sentence above.

    The musical definition is different somehow:

    "Individuare gli incisi equivale a focalizzare i frammenti più piccoli del discorso, che abbiano, però un deciso significato: passare dalle singole note agli incisi, concettualmente, è come passare dalle lettere dell’alfabeto alle parole di senso compiuto. L'ampiezza dei singoli incisi è variabile, ma l’eventuale minore lunghezza di uno è compensata dalla maggiore lunghezza dell'altro, per cui, mediamente, l’inciso dura una battuta e può trovarsi “tra le stanghette” o anche a cavallo di esse.
    L’asimmetria in ogni caso non nuoce al discorso musicale, anzi, ne esalta l’estetica, secondo il principio dell’unità nella varietà."


    http://www.scuolediballo.com/news_dettaglio.php?id=2107

    The inciso is the smallest part of the musical piece, a part that has a meaning by itself, like a group of notes going up the scale, or a 'trillo'... Sometimes the inciso corresponds to the beat; sometimes it sits astride the bar...

    I think there is no precise correspondence in English.

    Today, we use 'inciso' for any interruption, usually instrumental, like a bridge, a solo, but it's neither...
     
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