incline someone's ear

ortak

Senior Member
Turkish
When I was the listening memories of natives ; their outdoor cinema 25-30 years ago, daily lives, their experiances with foreign archeologists and inclining my ear their original Aegean accent.

Hello friends

I wonder if you use that phrase daily and is it understanable? I wanted to mean I was trying to listen something different while I was listening something another (memories). Normally, I focused on memories, but their accent some use at that moment made my attention divided so I also listened them.

I saw these alternatives on this dictionary.

Thanks in advance.
 
Last edited:
  • Beryl from Northallerton

    Senior Member
    British English
    If you 'incline your ear' to a particular (for example) speaker it carries the implication that you are well disposed towards that speaker (or what he has to say), as if he were preaching to the (already in part) converted - it is more than mere listening, it is favourably disposed listening.
     
    Last edited:

    ortak

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    To be honest, I couldn't understand exactly what you meant. Does it sound like avoiding to listen someone else and listen the other?

    When I was the listening memories of natives ; their outdoor cinema 25-30 years ago, daily lives and their experiances with foreign archeologists, I was a little distracted by their original Aegean accent.

    I guess this sentence can be better than previous one, but I didn't understand what incline one's ear means.
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    When I was the listening memories of natives ; their outdoor cinema 25-30 years ago, daily lives, their experiances with foreign archeologists and inclining my ear their original Aegean accent.

    Hello friends

    I wonder if you use that phrase daily and is it understanable? I wanted to mean I was trying to listen something different while I was listening something another (memories). Normally, I focused on memories, but their accent some use at that moment made my attention divided so I also listened them.
    Your example sentence below isn't in fact a sentence, because it has no finite verb in the main clause. It is one subordinate clause of time introduced by 'when'
    When I was the listening memories of natives ; their outdoor cinema 25-30 years ago, daily lives, their experiances with foreign archeologists and inclining my ear their original Aegean accent.
    I have never heard the expression "incline one's ear to...", so I would have to guess what it means. I would say "While I was listening ............, my attention was distracted by their...... ."
    There are several mistakes in the sentence, so you need to very carefully edit it.
    :)
    Hermione
     

    ortak

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    It means that you're listening to something you like.
    Yes, something I find enjoyable and interesting, but okey let's say 'Like'. :)

    Your example sentence below isn't in fact a sentence, because it has no finite verb in the main clause. It is one subordinate clause of time introduced by 'when'


    I have never heard the expression "incline one's ear to...", so I would have to guess what it means. I would say "While I was listening ............, my attention was distracted by their...... ."
    There are several mistakes in the sentence, so you need to very carefully edit it.
    :)
    Hermione
    Yes, exactly and that's why I wrote another sentence above :

    While I was the listening memories of natives ; their outdoor cinema 25-30 years ago, daily lives and their experiances with foreign archeologists, I was a little distracted by their original Aegean accent.
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    I have only heard "incline my ear" or "incline my ear to". I don't think you can "incline your ear something", can you? It doesn't make sense to me. It's not a transitive verb in this context.

    I hear it most often in the reading of Bible passages, particularly the Psalms.

    Psalm 78:1-3 Give ear, O my people, to my law: Incline your ears to the words of my mouth.

    Jeremiah 34:14 At the end of seven years ye shall let go every man his brother that is a Hebrew, that hath been sold unto thee, and hath served thee six years, thou shalt let him go free from thee: but your fathers hearkened not unto me, neither inclined their ear.

    (American Standard Version quoted)

    It sounds very old-fashioned to me.

    To say it in everyday terms, I think I would say:

    "While I was the listening memories of natives - their outdoor cinema 25-30 years ago, their daily lives and their experiences with foreign archeologists - their distinct Aegean accent caught my ear/attention."
     

    Irelia20150604

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    If you 'incline your ear' to a particular (for example) speaker it carries the implication that you are well disposed towards that speaker (or what he has to say), as if he were preaching to the (already in part) converted - it is more than mere listening, it is favourably disposed listening.
    Thank you for four explanation. :D I was also confused by such a "to incline" in Jane Eyre:

    "You say you never heard of a Mrs. Rochester at the house up yonder, Wood; but I daresay you have many a time inclined your ear to gossip about the mysterious lunatic kept there under watch and ward."

    Now it's clear now. :idea:
     

    GreenWhiteBlue

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    "Incline your ear" means to listen to someone. The literal idea is that you are bending towards someone because you want to hear that person better.

    I am amazed that any educated native speakers would find the phrase unfamiliar. It is, for example, used repeatedly in the Authorized ("King James") Version translation of the Bible, as in this quote from the Book of Proverbs:
    My son, attend to my words; incline thine ear unto my sayings.
    You also find it used in Shakespeare, as in Measure for Measure, when the duke says
    Dear Isabel,
    I have a motion much imports your good;
    Whereto if you’ll a willing ear incline,
    What’s mine is yours, and what is yours is mine.
     

    You little ripper!

    Senior Member
    Australian English
    I am amazed that any educated native speakers would find the phrase unfamiliar. It is, for example, used repeatedly in the Authorized ("King James") Version translation of the Bible
    I loathed Shakespeare, but did have a strict religious upbringing so that's probably why it's familiar to me. It's not an idiom you read or hear often, nowadays.

    Incline | Define Incline at Dictionary.com
    12. incline one's ear, to listen, especially willingly or favorably:
    to incline one's ear to another's plea.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top