Include <them / him / her> in the loop

ninjutsu

Senior Member
Japanese
Sorry to deviate from the topic a bit.

Why would somebody says " Include them in the loop" if they missed a person in the loop, why not "include him/her in the loop?

<<Split from here>>
 
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  • Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    This seems to have been split from a thread about e-mail.

    "Include X in the loop" simply means to inform X, usually by a cc on the e-mail. We'd say him if male, her if female, them if more than one person.
     

    Libeccio

    Senior Member
    bilingual US english and Italian
    Why would somebody :cross:says :tick:say " Include them in the loop" if they missed a person in the loop, why not "include him/her in the loop?
    It could be that they are including more than one person in the loop.

    Normally "them" is used when you talk about more than one person, but it can also be used in certain situations to talk about a single person, if you don't want to reference their gender, or if you don't know their gender.

    For example on an internet message board like this, I could refer to you, ninjutsu, as "they" because I don't know if you are male or female.
     

    ninjutsu

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    It could be that they are including more than one person in the loop.

    Normally "them" is used when you talk about more than one person, but it can also be used in certain situations to talk about a single person, if you don't want to reference their gender, or if you don't know their gender.

    For example on an internet message board like this, I could refer to you, ninjutsu, as "they" because I don't know if you are male or female.
    Noted.

    Somebody is singular, why not "says"?
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    Noted.

    Somebody is singular, why not "says"?
    Because modal auxiliary verbs* are followed by the bare infinitive.

    * will, shall, would, could, can, may, might, must, should, ought not, and need not. Ought and need are followed by the full infinitive.
     
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