incrociare le dita

joe86

Senior Member
Hello everybody,

the italian idiomatic expression "incrociare le dita" is similar to "toccando ferro" (touch wood).
I was wondering if I could translate "incrociamo le dita" into "let's keep our fingers crossed".

Here is an example:
If I said "buona fortuna per la partita di domani!" - (risposta) "incrociamo le dita!"
would "I wish you luck for tomorrow game!" - (reply) "Let's keep our fingers crossed!" be correct?

Thanks
 
  • Waterfall123

    Senior Member
    Italian
    Hello everybody,

    the italian idiomatic expression "incrociare le dita" is similar to "toccando ferro" (touch wood).
    I was wondering if I could translate "incrociamo le dita" into "let's keep our fingers crossed".

    Here is an example:
    If I said "buona fortuna per la partita di domani!" - (risposta) "incrociamo le dita!"
    would "I wish you luck for tomorrow game!" - (reply) "Let's keep our fingers crossed!" be correct?

    Thanks

    Si è giusto!:)
     

    dafne108

    New Member
    italy italiano
    Hi! If I said "incrociare le dita per qualcosa/qualcuno", the translation "keep your fingers crossed for sth/sb" would be right?Thanks
     

    joe86

    Senior Member
    Hello,

    You are right mate. I'm not an english native speaker but I guess you can trust me on this matter. I'll give you a few examples, here you go:

    "Keep your fingers crossed for me please!"

    "Keep your fingers crossed for me that my idea works out"

    "I'll keep my fingers crossed for you before you scratch that lottery ticket!"

    Hope it helps

    Joe
     

    You little ripper!

    Senior Member
    Australian English
    Hello,

    You are right mate. I'm not an english native speaker but I guess you can trust me on this matter. I'll give you a few examples, here you go:

    "Keep your fingers crossed for me please!"

    "Keep your fingers crossed for me that my idea works out"

    "I'll keep my fingers crossed for you before you scratch that lottery ticket!"

    Hope it helps

    Joe
    Explained probably better than most natives would have done. :)
     

    Arrabbiato

    Senior Member
    US English
    Joe 86-just as an additional point of reference, the American expression for not tempting fate, and for continued good luck is to "knock on wood" not to "touch wood"-no one in the US would understand to "touch wood."

    Example: I haven't been sick in four years, knock on wood! I am boasting here, but I don't want to tempt fate, so I have to add "knock on wood."
     
    Joe 86-just as an additional point of reference, the American expression for not tempting fate, and for continued good luck is to "knock on wood" not to "touch wood"-no one in the US would understand to "touch wood."

    Example: I haven't been sick in four years, knock on wood! I am boasting here, but I don't want to tempt fate, so I have to add "knock on wood."

    In England we never use "knock on wood". When we say "touch wood" for luck it is not unknown to touch your head as if to suggest it is full of sawdust if there is no wooden table/chair or other wood to hand. Do you ever do that in the wonderful US of A when you say knock on wood ?
     

    beccamutt

    Senior Member
    English - US
    In England we never use "knock on wood". When we say "touch wood" for luck it is not unknown to touch your head as if to suggest it is full of sawdust if there is no wooden table/chair or other wood to hand. Do you ever do that in the wonderful US of A when you say knock on wood ?

    When I say knock on wood I usually tap my head with my knuckles. :)
     
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