indirect complement / indirect object

Jose68

Member
Spanish, Spain
Hello, I've read a sentence as follow, 'In sentences with two complements the indirect object comes immediately after the verb (ie Brenda gave me a kiss); shoudn't it be the INDIRECT COMPLEMENT rather than INDIRECT OBJECT?
 
  • Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    No.

    You're thinking of Spanish terminology, I believe.

    What's the source of the sentence you've quoted?
     

    Jose68

    Member
    Spanish, Spain
    No.

    You're thinking of Spanish terminology, I believe.

    What's the source of the sentence you've quoted?
    It was a grammar book, I've been leafing several and can't remember which.

    Moderator note: Spanish edited out.
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    'Object' is a well-established traditional term. 'Complement' is in more modern use, and covers various different grammatical roles, including objects:

    Brenda kissed me. [This sentence has an object, which is one kind of complement.]
    Brenda gave me a kiss. [This sentence has two objects, which are both complements, and which we distinguish as the indirect object and then the direct object.]
    Brenda was elected president. [This is a subject complement, a different kind of complement. It equates Brenda = president]
    Brenda considers me desirable. [Object complement, a different kind of complement. It equates me = desirable]

    The term 'complement' is used for any grammatical role which is essential to the verb. It does not just mean 'object', which is one of the basic kinds of complement.

    It is contrasted with other grammatical roles which you could just omit, such as 'on Tuesday' or 'in the kitchen' or 'slowly' or 'because I want to'. These are not complements.
     

    Hans in Texas

    Senior Member
    US English
    If both objects/complements are nouns, the indirect obj comes first.
    If one is a pronoun, the pronoun comes first, and if the pronoun is the direct obj, then “to” is required before the indirect obj: she showed it to the children.
    If both are pronouns, then direct obj + to + indirect obj: she showed it to them.
     

    Jose68

    Member
    Spanish, Spain
    'Object' is a well-established traditional term. 'Complement' is in more modern use, and covers various different grammatical roles, including objects:

    Brenda kissed me. [This sentence has an object, which is one kind of complement.]
    Brenda gave me a kiss. [This sentence has two objects, which are both complements, and which we distinguish as the indirect object and then the direct object.]
    Brenda was elected president. [This is a subject complement, a different kind of complement. It equates Brenda = president]
    Brenda considers me desirable. [Object complement, a different kind of complement. It equates me = desirable]

    The term 'complement' is used for any grammatical role which is essential to the verb. It does not just mean 'object', which is one of the basic kinds of complement.

    It is contrasted with other grammatical roles which you could just omit, such as 'on Tuesday' or 'in the kitchen' or 'slowly' or 'because I want to'. These are not complements.
    In other words, even though both 'me' and 'kiss' are the verb's complements, they are not called Indirect and direct COMPLIMEMTS but OBJECTS?
     

    entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    These are just names. They're not important. They don't tell you important facts about the grammar. The usual name for 'me' in 'She have me a kiss' is the indirect object. That's just convention - grammarians choose to call it that. They could call it the aardvark object, or the banana complement. It would be the same thing. The grammar is the same. In describing English grammar, we don't use the term 'indirect complement'. We also don't use the term 'banana complement'.
     

    Jose68

    Member
    Spanish, Spain
    These are just names. They're not important. They don't tell you important facts about the grammar. The usual name for 'me' in 'She have me a kiss' is the indirect object. That's just convention - grammarians choose to call it that. They could call it the aardvark object, or the banana complement. It would be the same thing. The grammar is the same. In describing English grammar, we don't use the term 'indirect complement'. We also don't use the term 'banana complement'.
    Much obliged
     
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