indirect object/oblique object

< Previous | Next >

Sar9a

Member
italian
And flow isn't exclusive to artists and athletes.
to artists and athletes.
Is it an oblique object? Or an indirect object? Because I would say that it completes the meaning of the sentence so it's necessary but it doesn't seem to be a proper indirect object.
when fully engaged with their work or hobbies.
with their work or hobbies. I would say it's an oblique object,right?
Thank you if you spend some time to look at my questions
 
Last edited:
  • entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    I don't know the term 'oblique object'. In both cases you have a preposition phrase which is a complement of an adjective ('exclusive' and 'engaged'). An indirect object is a complement of a verb.
     

    SevenDays

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    And flow isn't exclusive to artists and athletes.
    to artists and athletes.
    Is it an oblique object? Or an indirect object? Because I would say that it completes the meaning of the sentence so it's necessary but it doesn't seem to be a proper indirect object.
    when fully engaged with their work or hobbies.
    with their work or hobbies. I would say it's an oblique object,right?
    Thank you if you spend some time to look at my questions
    I think "oblique" is a term that's not terribly important or relevant in English. Strictly speaking, "oblique" is any noun, pronoun or adjective that's not in the nominative or vocative case. It's a term that really applies to languages rich in inflection, but English isn't one of those languages.

    In any event, in English, some use the term oblique object for a noun phrase that is semantically related to the verb (it's necessary to complete the verb's meaning); however, the noun phrase doesn't directly follow the verb, because the noun phrase is the object of a preposition: I rely on my friends. In such case, "my friends" is described as the oblique object of the verb "rely."

    Others use the label "oblique object" as synonym for "complement of preposition." And so in

    I rely on my friends
    And flow isn't exclusive to artists and athletes.
    When fully engaged with their work or hobbies


    "my friends" is the oblique object of the preposition on, "artists and athletes" is the oblique object of the preposition to, and "their work or hobbies" is the oblique object of the preposition with.

    More often than not, I suspect that the term "oblique" just isn't used. What you have are prepositional phrases as complement of a verb (rely) or adjective (exclusive, engaged).
     

    billj

    Senior Member
    British English
    When we talk of 'oblique' we usually mean one of two things:

    1. an NP functioning as complement of a preposition, cf.

    [1a] He said some cruel things.
    [1b] He insisted on an adjournment.

    In [1] "some cruel things" is object of "say", but in [2] "an adjournment" is an oblique, a complement of the preposition "on" rather than of the verb "insist".

    or

    2. a predicative oblique, cf.

    [2a] She was treasurer.
    [2b] She served as treasurer.

    In [2a] "treasurer" is predicative complement of "be", but in [2b] "treasurer" is complement of "as", and is analysed as a predicative oblique.

    Is that what you were getting at?
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top