Indonesian : Jangan lupa makan <yang> teratur!

mink-shin

Senior Member
Korean - Korea, Republic of
Hi, I'm Mink-shin who's new here.
Nice to meet you, Other Languages Forum members.

My Indonesian friend told me, "Jangan lupa makan yang teratur".

The word 'yang' made me little confused. Would you mind helping me to figure it out?

According to Sederet.com, Jangan means "don't" and lupa means "forget" and makan means "eat" and yang means "the" and teratur means "regular".
So I guess that my friend's sentence means "Don't forget to eat regularly." (If I am wrong, please tell me :) ) But I want to know her sentence perfectly.

I can't figure it out how the word "yang" works in her sentence.

Thank you for reading this thread.
 
  • Rani_Author

    Senior Member
    Indonesia - Indonesian
    :D:D:D

    According to Sederet.com, Jangan means "don't" :tick: and lupa means "forget" :tick: and makan means "eat" :tick: and yang means "the" :cross: and teratur means "regular" :tick:.
    So I guess that my friend's sentence means "Don't forget to eat regularly." :thumbsup::thumbsup::thumbsup: (If I am wrong, please tell me :) ) But I want to know her sentence perfectly.
    Your final translation is perfect. Nothing wrong. The literal translation is "Don't forget to regular eat!"

    Maybe it doesn't make any sense in the other languages. But, it's a kind of care in Indonesian culture and custom to the opposite gender. And if you are closer to any Indonesian, you would read and hear this sentence much more per day. :rolleyes: I meant, it's one of points you could consider how care is any Indonesian to you. If she cares more, she would give you this kind of sentence much more per day. :cool:

    I can't figure it out how the word "yang" works in her sentence.
    "Yang" is a conjunction which combines two elements of sentence that the positions aren't equal. In the context above, it's to combine the verb "makan" and the adjective "teratur".

    Other examples:
    Lelaki Korea yang tampan (a handsome Korean man). :arrow: a noun and an adjective.
    Lelaki yang benar-benar menarik (a truly interesting man). :arrow: a noun and an adverb.
    Istirahat yang cukup! (Take enough rest!) :arrow: a verb and an adverb.

    Maybe my examples don't make any sense in English, but they are like that in Indonesian.

    Or, it could use as the translations of "who, whom, whose, which, that, where" in compound sentences.
    Gadis yang mencintaimu (A girl who loves you).
    Gadis yang kamu cintai (A girl whom you love).

    행운을 빕니다, Mas Min! :)
     

    mink-shin

    Senior Member
    Korean - Korea, Republic of
    Halo. Thank you for answering me, Rani. :)

    Jangan lupa makan yang teratur
    it's one of points you could consider how care is any Indonesian to you.
    But, it's a kind of care in Indonesian culture and custom to the opposite gender.
    Can I use this to someone whose gender's same with me?

    I don't get this below perfectly, Rani. Can you explain me furthermore, especially the point I'm curious with?

    "Yang" is a conjunction which combines two elements of sentence that the positions aren't equal. In the context above, it's to combine the verb "makan" and the adjective "teratur".

    Other examples:
    Lelaki Korea yang tampan (a handsome Korean man). :arrow: a noun and an adjective.
    Lelaki yang benar-benar menarik (a truly interesting man). :arrow: a noun and an adverb.
    Istirahat yang cukup! (Take enough rest!) :arrow: a verb and an adverb.
    First, what's the position you meant with by the way? I don't get what's the position. Because I can't imagine any two words that have same position. If there'd been no chance any two words having same position, you wouldn't have said to me like that. So I think it's not the position that I usually am familiar with.

    There's an interesting point in your examples, Rani.

    One of your examples : Lelaki Korea yang tampan.

    Can I ask you why you didn't combine Lelaki and Korea using yang and why you didn't combine benar-benar and menarik using yang? It seems that there is no need of two yang in one phrase. Is it right?

    Maybe my examples don't make any sense in English, but they are like that in Indonesian.
    Okay, I see. Thanks :)

    Or, it could use as the translations of "who, whom, whose, which, that, where" in compound sentences.
    Gadis yang mencintaimu (A girl who loves you).
    Gadis yang kamu cintai (A girl whom you love).
    Cool. Thanks.
     

    Rani_Author

    Senior Member
    Indonesia - Indonesian
    Can I use this to someone whose gender's same with me?
    Of course, not. As I said above, it was just used to the opposite gender whom we care about. I understand if the sense in English is nothing. It's just like usual sentence. But, if you use it to any person in the same gender with you in Indonesian, it would be 100 % strange and any Indonesians could think that you are gay. We, Indonesians, just always make a distance between men. If two men seem rather close each other, we would think that they are gay.

    I don't get this below perfectly, Rani. Can you explain me furthermore, especially the point I'm curious with?

    First, what's the position you meant with by the way? I don't get what's the position. Because I can't imagine any two words that have same position. If there'd been no chance any two words having same position, you wouldn't have said to me like that. So I think it's not the position that I usually am familiar with.
    Complicated question, huh? :rolleyes: Indonesian just uses the word "yang" too often. It made any foreigners get headache to learn it.

    See it!
    Jangan lupa makan yang teratur :arrow: jangan (prohibition word), lupa (first verb), makan (second verb), yang (conjunction), teratur (adjective).

    In Indonesian sentence, after verb, it should be adverb (without noun) or noun. But, because, "teratur" is an adjective, we use "yang" as the conjuction between verb and adjective. If you don't want to use "yang" as the conjuction, you should use the adverb form behind of the verb:

    Jangan lupa makan secara teratur :arrow: jangan (prohibition word), lupa (first verb), makan (second verb), secara teratur (adverb).

    Can you understand the first case? :)

    Next:

    There's an interesting point in your examples, Rani.

    One of your examples : Lelaki Korea yang tampan.

    Can I ask you why you didn't combine Lelaki and Korea using yang?
    You should know that the translation of "Korean man" and "the man of Korea" are same in Indonesian: Lelaki Korea. The word "Korea" in Indonesia could use for noun or for the adjective. We can't add any "yang" in front of the word like this to omit any ambiguity.

    Lelaki Korea yang tampan :arrow: Lelaki (noun), Korea (noun/ adjective), yang (conjunction), tampan (adjective).

    Or, if you want to change the position of "yang", you could write like this:

    Lelaki yang berkewarganegaraan Korea tampan (The man who has Korean citizenship is handsome) :arrow: Lelaki (noun), yang (conjuction), berkewarganegaraan (verb), Korea (noun), tampan (adjective).

    Other example: Kota Probolinggo yang sejuk (The cool Probolinggo city) :arrow: Kota (noun), Probolinggo (noun/ adjective), yang (conjunction), sejuk (adjective).

    If you want to replace the position of yang, it would be:

    Kota yang bernama Probolinggo sejuk (The city that called Probolinggo is cool) :arrow: Kota (noun), yang (conjunction), bernama (verb), Probolinggo (noun), sejuk (adjective).

    Understood the second case? Or more confused? :cool:

    Can I ask you why you didn't combine benar-benar and menarik using yang?
    The reason is simple. We can't use the word "yang" to combine the adverb and the adjective.

    Lelaki yang benar-benar menarik. :tick: :arrow: Lelaki (noun), yang (conjunction), benar-benar (adverb), menarik (adjective).

    Lelaki benar-benar yang menarik. :cross:

    I'm sure that you understand perfectly now about this case.

    It seems that there is no need of two yang in one phrase. Is it right?
    Right. To make it effective. See the example below!
    Buku yang merah yang membara (The bright red book). :arrow: Buku (noun), yang (conjunction), merah (adjective), yang (conjunction), membara (adjective). This phrase is Ok. But, it would sound that your Indonesian isn't in the highest level.

    The better phrase would be: "Buku yang merah membara" or "buku merah yang membara".

    Maybe you would ask, "Why should we use 'yang' in 'Istirahat yang cukup'"? :) Because, "cukup" could be used as adjective and adverb in Indonesian. The word "yang" is just to affirm that it's adverb, not adjective. :rolleyes:

    Selamat mempelajari bahasa Indonesia, Mas Min! :D Terima kasih sudah tertarik mempelajarinya.
     
    Last edited:

    mink-shin

    Senior Member
    Korean - Korea, Republic of
    See it!
    Jangan lupa makan yang teratur :arrow: jangan (prohibition word), lupa (first verb), makan (second verb), yang (conjunction), teratur (adjective).

    In Indonesian sentence, after verb, it should be adverb (without noun) or noun. But, because, "teratur" is an adjective, we use "yang" as the conjuction between verb and adjective. If you don't want to use "yang" as the conjuction, you should use the adverb form behind of the verb:

    Jangan lupa makan secara teratur :arrow: jangan (prohibition word), lupa (first verb), makan (second verb), secara teratur (adverb).

    Can you understand the first case? :)
    Perfect!
    You should know that the translation of "Korean man" and "the man of Korea" are same in Indonesian: Lelaki Korea. The word "Korea" in Indonesia could use for noun or for the adjective. We can't add any "yang" in front of the word like this to omit any ambiguity.

    Lelaki Korea yang tampan :arrow: Lelaki (noun), Korea (noun/ adjective), yang (conjunction), tampan (adjective).

    Or, if you want to change the position of "yang", you could write like this:

    Lelaki yang berkewarganegaraan Korea tampan (The man who has Korean citizenship is handsome) :arrow: Lelaki (noun), yang (conjuction), berkewarganegaraan (verb), Korea (noun), tampan (adjective).

    Other example: Kota Probolinggo yang sejuk (The cool Probolinggo city) :arrow: Kota (noun), Probolinggo (noun/ adjective), yang (conjunction), sejuk (adjective).

    If you want to replace the position of yang, it would be:

    Kota yang bernama Probolinggo sejuk (The city that called Probolinggo is cool) :arrow: Kota (noun), yang (conjunction), bernama (verb), Probolinggo (noun), sejuk (adjective).

    Understood the second case? Or more confused? :cool:
    Cool!

    The reason is simple. We can't use the word "yang" to combine the adverb and the adjective.

    Lelaki yang benar-benar menarik. :tick: :arrow: Lelaki (noun), yang (conjunction), benar-benar (adverb), menarik (adjective).

    Lelaki benar-benar yang menarik. :cross:

    I'm sure that you understand perfectly now about this case.
    You're right.
    Right. To make it effective. See the example below!
    Buku yang merah yang membara (The bright red book). :arrow: Buku (noun), yang (conjunction), merah (adjective), yang (conjunction), membara (adjective). This phrase is Ok. But, it would sound that your Indonesian isn't in the highest level.

    The better phrase would be: "Buku yang merah membara" or "buku merah yang membara".

    Maybe you would ask, "Why should we use 'yang' in 'Istirahat yang cukup'"? :) Because, "cukup" could be used as adjective and adverb in Indonesian. The word "yang" is just to affirm that it's adverb, not adjective. :rolleyes:

    Selamat mempelajari bahasa Indonesia, Mas Min! :D Terima kasih sudah tertarik mempelajarinya.
    Thank you for your kind lecture, Professor.
     
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