Infirmus Adiuvandum Periti

voltape

Senior Member
Peruvian Spanish/USA English
I have a diploma from the University of Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras. It is a Master Degree. It reads : "Infirmus Adiuvandum Periti" - How can I translate it: Literally it’d be “Expert in Helping - or caring for - the Sick” – Would that be a Nurse? Also, can an “expert” be granted a Master’s degree? Thanks
 
  • voltape

    Senior Member
    Peruvian Spanish/USA English
    Hai ben ragione! (ho ascoltato questo nell'opera "Il Tabarro" di Puccini) - mi sono sbagliato - è INFIRMOS certamente, accusativo plurale e non "Infirmus" nominativo singolare
     

    bearded

    Senior Member
    can an “expert” be granted a Master’s degree? Thanks
    Ok infirmos. As for 'periti' (which can also mean 'specialist') it can be either genitive singular (''of the specialist'') or nominative plural (specialists). Not knowing if there is further context (for example ''we grant him the title of specialist...''), the latter is possible: specialists in helping the sick/sick people.
    However, I find ''adiuvandum'' a bit odd, since normally peritus is followed by a genitive (peritus alicuius rei..). Alternatively, there should be at least the preposition 'ad' (ad adiuvandum..). But in a Master Degree, presumably the Latin they use is not exactly classic..
     
    Last edited:

    voltape

    Senior Member
    Peruvian Spanish/USA English
    PROBLEM SOLVED - I asked the graduate as to his degree - He had the translation into Spanish given to him by the University, plus the transcript in English - so for the record in case anyone needs it: it is:
    LATIN: "Infirmus Adiuvandum Periti"
    SPANISH: "Maestro en Consejería de Rehabilitación"
    ENGLISH: "Master of Rehabilitation Counselling"
    Well, this translation would defy the powers of a first-rate magician -
     
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