inflatable/floating things

Dymn

Senior Member
Time for a more literal thread about tangible objects :D

How would you call in your language/country:

Spain Spanish
1. Inflatable armbands for kids, for safety: manguitos
2. Inflatable toy to float, usually ring-shaped: flotador
3. Infatable structure for leisure, not necessarily in the water: inflable
4. Lifebuoy, a ring for lifesaving purposes: salvavidas (in the same vein, bote salvavidas is a lifeboat and chaleco salvavidas a lifevest)
5. Buoy, for delimitation purposes or the like: boya
 
  • Yendred

    Senior Member
    Français - France
    French:
    1. bouée brassard
    2. bouée
    3. matelas gonflable/pneumatique
    4. bouée de sauvetage
    5. bouée
     
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    TheCrociato91

    Senior Member
    Italian - Northern Italy
    Italian

    1. braccioli
    2. salvagente, galleggiante
    3. gonfiabile
    4. salvagente a giambella, salvagente, ciambella (lifeboat = scialuppa di salvataggio; lifevest = giubbotto salvagente, giubbotto di salvataggio)
    5. boa
     

    Dymn

    Senior Member
    1. Maniguets or maneguins, but many people say manguitos
    2. Flotador
    3. Inflable
    4. Salvavides (bot salvavides, armilla salvavides, but many people say xaleco salvavides for the latter)
    5. Boia
     

    Circunflejo

    Senior Member
    Castellano de Castilla
    1. Maniguets or maneguins, but many people say manguitos
    2. Flotador
    3. Inflable
    4. Salvavides (bot salvavides, armilla salvavides, but many people say xaleco salvavides for the latter)
    5. Boia
    Thank you.
     

    merquiades

    Senior Member
    English (USA Northeast)
    In the northeast US, at least, we had different words for all of these items:

    1. Inflatable armbands for kids, for safety: water wings
    2. Inflatable toy to float, usually ring-shaped: rubber tire
    3. Infatable structure for leisure, not necessarily in the water: air mattress
    4. Lifebuoy, a ring for lifesaving purposes: life saver, life preserver (in the same vein, life raft is a lifeboat and life jacket a lifevest)
    5. Buoy, for delimitation purposes or the like: buoy, float
     

    apmoy70

    Senior Member
    Greek
    Greek:

    1. «Μπρατσάκια» [braˈʦ͜a.ca] (neut. nom. pl.), in sing. «μπρατσάκι» [braˈʦ͜a.ci] (neut. nom.) --> little arm(s), diminutive of colloquial MoGr «μπράτσο» [ˈbra.ʦ͜ɔ] (neut.) --> arm < Ven. brazzo (a boomerang word: Classical Gr. «βραχίων» brăkʰíōn > Lat. bracchium > Ven. brazzo > Late Byz. Gr. μπράτσο).
    2. «Κουλ(λ)ούρα» [kuˈlu.ɾa] (fem.) --> ring < Byz. Gr. fem. «κολλούρα» kolloúra --> a kind of round cake < Classical fem. «κολλύρᾱ» kŏllū́rā, alt. «κολλούρᾱ» kŏlloúrā --> a kind of round cake, tablet (probably Pre-Greek. The variation υ/ου points to Pre-Greek origin).
    3. Usually «θαλάσσιο στρώμα» [θaˈla.si.ɔ ˈstrɔ.ma] --> sea-mattress.
    4. «Σωσίβιο» [sɔˈsi.vi.ɔ] (neut.) --> lit. a thing that can save one's life < Koine adj. «σωσίβιος, -ᾱ, -ον» sōsíbiŏs (masc.), sōsĭbíā (fem.), sōsíbiŏn (neut.), idem < combinatory «σωσ-» sōs- of Classical v. «σῴζω» sǫ́zō + «βίος» bíŏs (masc.).
    5(a). «Σημαντήρας» [si.manˈdi.ɾas] (masc.) < Koine 3rd declension noun «σημαντήρ» sēmantḗr (masc. nom. sing.), «σημαντῆρος» sēmăntêrŏs (masc. gen. sing.) --> herdsman, seal, signet, later also buoy < Classical neuter «σῆμα» sêmă.
    (b). «Σημαδούρα» [si.maˈðu.ɾa] (fem.) < «σῆμα» (see above) + ΜοGr productive suffix for feminine abstract & agent nouns «-ούρα» [-ˈu.ɾa] often augmentative, sometimes pejorative, depending on context (a Byz Gr loan from the Latin -ūra).
    (c). «Τσαμαδούρα» [ʦ͜a.maˈðu.ɾa] (fem.) < «σημαδούρα».
    (a) is formal used in writing, (b) is the colloquial name, (c) is nautical jargon.
     

    AndrasBP

    Senior Member
    Hungarian
    Hungarian:

    1. Inflatable armbands for kids, for safety: karúszó /'kɒru:so:/ (kar = arm; úszó = floater)
    2. Inflatable toy to float, usually ring-shaped: úszógumi /'u:so:gumi/ (úszó = floater, floating; gumi = rubber)
    3. Infatable structure for leisure, not necessarily in the water: gumimatrac /'gumimɒtrɒts/ (rubber mattress)
    4. Lifebuoy, a ring for lifesaving purposes: mentőöv /'mɛntø:øv/ (saving belt)
    5. Buoy, for delimitation purposes or the like: bója /'bo:jɒ/
     

    merquiades

    Senior Member
    English (USA Northeast)
    There is another flotation device which is long and thin, made of styrofoam, usually bright pink, orange or sky blue, and are completely bendable. In at least three languages they are named after food items which kind of resemble them with a bit of imagination:
    Noodle - English
    Frite - French
    Churro - Spanish
     

    apmoy70

    Senior Member
    Greek
    There is another flotation device which is long and thin, made of styrofoam, usually bright pink, orange or sky blue, and are completely bendable. In at least three languages they are named after food items which kind of resemble them with a bit of imagination:
    Noodle - English
    Frite - French
    Churro - Spanish
    Nothing fancy in Greek I'm afraid, it's just a «κύλινδρος αφρού» [ˈci.lin.ðrɔs aˈfru] --> foam cylinder

    -MoGr masc. noun «κύλινδρος» [ˈci.lin.ðrɔs] --> cylinder < Classical deverbative masc. noun «κύλινδρος kúlindrŏs --> rolling stone, tumbler, cylinder < Classical v. «κυλίνδω» kŭlíndō --> to roll, turn over; some philologists see a connection with PIE *(s)kel- to bend, curve, but for Beekes the word is hardly IE.
    -MoGr masc. noun «αφρός» [aˈfrɔs] (nom. sing.), «αφρού» [aˈfru] (gen. sing.) --> foam, lather < Classical masc. noun «ἀφρός» ăpʰrós --> foam, lather; some philologists see a connection with Arm. փրփուր (p'rp'ur), but for Beekes the «ἀ-» in the Greek word is problematic.
     

    ThomasK

    Senior Member
    Belgium, Dutch
    Dutch (Belgium, some other words might be used in the Netherlands)
    1. Inflatable armbands for kids, for safety: zwembandjes
    2. Inflatable toy to float, usually ring-shaped: zwemband
    3. Infatable structure for leisure, not necessarily in the water: luchtmatras (airmattress)
    4. Lifebuoy, a ring for lifesaving purposes: reddingsboei (in the same vein, reddingsboot is a lifeboat and reddingsvest a lifevest)
    5. Buoy, for delimitation purposes or the like: boei
     

    ThomasK

    Senior Member
    Belgium, Dutch
    Italian

    1. braccioli
    2. salvagente, galleggiante
    3. gonfiabile
    4. salvagente a giambella, salvagente, ciambella (lifeboat = scialuppa di salvataggio; lifevest = giubbotto salvagente, giubbotto di salvataggio)
    5. boa
    giambella= a doughnut? Giubotto= simply a vest, I suppose (not a jacket)/ is that a diminutive of some kind?
    1. Maniguets, or maneguins, but many people say manguitos
    4. Salvavides (bot salvavides, armilla salvavides, but many people say xaleco salvavides for the latter)
    Maniquets: are those literally some kind of sleeves? Xaleco = a veil?
     
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    TheCrociato91

    Senior Member
    Italian - Northern Italy
    giambella= a doughnut? Giubotto= simply a vest, I suppose (not a jacket)/ is that a diminutive of some kind?
    Yes, ciambella (or giambella, which however is a more old-fashioned spelling; I didn't realize I copy-pasted this spelling) is doughnut.
    Giubbotto has several meanings, including vest. I suppose it's the augmentative of giubba (which nowadays is not a very common word, and is mostly used with historical connotations, such as Giubbe rosse (Inghilterra) - Wikipedia)
     

    ThomasK

    Senior Member
    Belgium, Dutch
    Perfect information. Thanks a lot! - Or just one more question: the doughnut is supposed to have been introduced in the 17th century by the Dutch. However, did the Italians have their own doughnut before that along with their own word???
     
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