inflation measures move higher, a shift that is [appositive phrase?]

< Previous | Next >

amhashem

New Member
English
Hi guys, in the following sentence:



"Stabilizing energy prices are now helping headline inflation measures move higher, a shift that is expected to continue in the coming months as the early effects of low oil prices wane further."



is "a shift that is expected...." a appositive phrase modifying stabilizing energy prices? Thank you.
 
  • amhashem

    New Member
    English
    Hi Kate,

    Thank you. Ok I thought so.

    How about:
    U.S. consumer prices increased for the second consecutive month in March after falling through much of the winter, a sign that U.S. inflation may be stabilizing.

    I understand appositives and how they modify a noun or pronoun, but I read many article where they have appositives in this format. Thanks.
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    An appositive would be:
    U.S. consumer prices increased for the second consecutive month in March after falling through much of the winter, a season that follows autumn.
     

    amhashem

    New Member
    English
    I see. So what would my example be then?

    Btw, my examples are from the Wall Street Journal, not examples I made up.
     

    JustKate

    Senior Member
    Appositives rename something:
    "JustKate, English Only moderator, posted in the thread." The appositive is "English Only moderator."
    "These sentences were published in The New York Times, one of the most influential newspapers in America." The appositive is "one of the most influential newspapers in America."

    Yours (or rather, The Wall Street Journal's) are dependent clauses, I think. If there's a way to classify them more specifically, I hope someone else will chime in. What they're doing is expanding on the ideas in the first half of the sentences. But they're not renaming those ideas, just expanding on them.
     

    JustKate

    Senior Member
    You're going to need someone with more technical grammatical knowledge than I possess, I'm afraid. Perhaps someone else will illuminate us both.

    It does sometimes happen that descriptive clauses can fall into a gray area - kind of appositives but kind of not. I can't think of any examples right at the moment, but I have run across some. These seem to me to clearly fall into the "not appositives" category, though.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top