information in a case is presented in chunks to pause the process of care at key junctures

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ida2

Senior Member
Persian - Iran
Hello,

In the context below, could you please explain/paraphrase the bold part?

Clinical ethics can help physicians identify, understand, and resolve common ethical issues in patient care. By studying paradigmatic “teaching cases,” physicians can gain vicarious experience in identifying and resolving ethical dilemmas. Cases help physicians learn how to interpret ethical guidelines in particular situations, how to distinguish a case from other apparently similar cases, which differences between cases should lead to a different decision or action, and when exceptions to guidelines are justified. The cases in this book are based on real cases, and information in a case is presented in chunks to pause the process of care at key junctures to allow reflection, analysis, and discussion.

Source: Resolving Ethical Dilemmas: A Guide for Clinicians by Bernard Lo, 6th edition
 
  • Parliament

    Member
    English (UK) & Dutch (NL)
    Information in each case is given in portions, or "chunks". This means that, after each part of information given, you are allowed to pause and reflect/analyse/discuss the information. They do so at key junctures in the care process. In other words: when the process enters a different phase.

    For example, as we're dealing with medicine, they could provide a pause between the information on the symptoms (as the patient describes them) and the diagnosis.
     
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