infusion

macdevster

Senior Member
USA, English
I know what the word means in English, but what are "infusions" in France with regard to drinks? e.g., infusion-chocolat
 
  • wildan1

    Moderando ma non troppo (French-English, CC Mod)
    English - USA
    Une infusion is what we usually call herb tea in the US. (The French only call thé the drink that actually has the leaves of the specific tea plant.)

    Infusion-chocolat--not sure about that one... I can only imagine hot chocolate in a teabag! (That can't be right...)
     

    zaz2kerlaz

    Senior Member
    France ; French
    I looked up in the dictionnary, they give : herbal tea.
    I guess a synonym would be "tisane".
     

    Missrapunzel

    Senior Member
    French (France)
    Infusion looks like tea (you pour hot water on the bag into your cup) but there are no tea leaves in it. There are only herbs like lime blossom, camomile, ...
    There might be something with a chocolate taste. :confused:
     

    zaz2kerlaz

    Senior Member
    France ; French
    infusion chocolat, c'est un goût chocolat dans une tisane où il y a sûrement plein d'autres trucs!
     

    nannis2001

    Senior Member
    Arabic - French - English
    Infusion = TEA.
    Boisson faite d'eau bouillante versée sur une substance de laquelle on veut extraire les principes solubles.
     

    Teafrog

    Senior Member
    UK English (& rusty French…)
    Infusion looks like tea (you pour hot water on the bag into your cup) but there are no tea leaves in it. There are only herbs like lime blossom, camomile, ...
    There might be something with a chocolate taste. :confused:
    The dust has settled on this thread, but I require a confirmation, hence this post.
    Hey, Missy, what do you mean "looks like tea". Isn't it a tea in its own right? :confused:

    Il y a le thé 'à l'anglaise', p/ex du style "Assam, avec du lait" (usual, everyday, bog-standard tea), ou des thés aux herbes, du style 'cranberry, rasberry and elderflower' ou 'peppermint tea' ou 'blackcurrant tea'.
    Des infusions, ce sont donc des thés aux herbes (sans lait, bien sûr)? :confused: (herbal teas)
    Correct?
     

    Robbyn

    Senior Member
    Français, arabe
    Infusion : opération qui consiste à verser un liquide bouillant sur une substance contenant des parties solubles.
    D'où infusion de chocolat puisqu'il est soluble....
     

    Kelly B

    Senior Member
    USA English
    I think thé refers specifically to an infusion of thea/camellia sinensis, the tea plant. If it doesn't include the leaf of that plant, it isn't really du thé; strictly speaking, it isn't tea, either, but in practice, Americans call all those other infusions herbal teas, just as you do in England.
     

    Teafrog

    Senior Member
    UK English (& rusty French…)
    I think thé refers specifically to an infusion of thea/camellia sinensis, the tea plant. If it doesn't include the leaf of that plant, it isn't really du thé; strictly speaking, it isn't tea, either, but in practice, Americans call all those other infusions herbal teas, just as you do in England.
    Mhhh:). So you think the French refer to 'black tea' (such as Indian or African teas) with milk' as "thé", and all other herbal teas as "infusion"? Correct?

    What would the French call, say, Rooibos tea (from South Africa, 'Red Bush tea) which is not of the "tea plant" you describe; une tisane de Rooibos? What about a peppermint tea, is it un thé à la menthe or une tisane de menthe; and how is "peppermint tea" differenciated from "spearmint tea"? What about Chinese green tea? Is it "thé" or "tisane", as it is drunk without milk?

    This is at the very root of my Q, and I would like a few French connoisseurs (I'm confident our French friends can figure out what this means :D) to explain the difference between, and what is meant by "tisane", "thé au fruits" (herbal teas?) and "thé" (have I missed any?).
    It is often awkward for Brits to go to France, ask for a tea , and be given some weird stuff resembling dishwater :eek:

    Robbyn and Nannis2001 both come from (French and Arabic speaking) countries, where tea is used extensively. They describe "tea" (in general term) as pouring boiling water over any soluble substance. There is no mention of "tisane". As far as I'm concerned, a "tisane" and an "infusion" are the same thing.
    I am still confused :confused:, as you may have gathered.

    Could a kind (French) soul pleeeeeeeease put me out of my plight, as well as nailing this long-standing confusion between Brits and their Gallic cousins? :)
    Ta!
     

    grignotine

    Member
    France, French
    Hm a storm in a teacup, isn't it?

    May i suggest the excellent book A year in the Merde by Stephen Clarke, which has a whole chapter, dealing extensively with this never-ended (and hopefully never-ending) war? ;)
     

    Punky Zoé

    Senior Member
    Pau
    France - français
    Hello teafrog

    Maybe you will change your nickname to tisanefrog ? :D
    I think, we, French, do call thé anykind of beverage made from leaves of tea tree (théier) from any countries (China, Ceylan ...), herbal teas are tisanes (as it is in English, isn't it ?) or infusions.

    As for rooibos tea, we call it in an improper way "thé rouge".

    Don't think I will help ...
     

    KaRiNe_Fr

    Senior Member
    Français, French - France
    Salut Teaf',

    I don't know if it could help you to understand, but here is how I use those terms:
    • une infusion : terme générique regroupant toute sorte de boissons chaudes avec des plantes (thé compris)
    • une tisane : une infusion mais qui n'est pas du thé
    • un thé : une infusion faite uniquement avec des feuilles de thé. Donc, euh... du thé :D Mais comme l'a souligné PZ (avec le thé rouge) y'aurait des abus de langage... :rolleyes:
     

    RuK

    Senior Member
    English/lives France
    Rooibos is always called thé rouge. I don't think there's much of a hard and fast rule. However, in more than 20 years of asking for tea, at least occasionally, in restaurants and cafés I have never once been served anything but black tea. If there's a choice of green tea, or jasmin, or herbal, the waiter asks.
     

    grignotine

    Member
    France, French
    En France nous parlons plutôt de thé noir (les Chinois ne comprennent pas pourquoi) que de thé rouge.

    Nous connaissons aussi le thé vert et même le thé blanc.

    De la même façon, nous parlons de thé à la menthe puisqu'il s'agit de thé noir infusé avec des feuilles de menthe.

    Pour le reste, j'invite Teafrog à se "connecthé" sur les nombreux sites francophones proposés par les amoureux du thé.

    Je me permets juste de "cithé" Wikipedia, quant à la confusion que peut induire l'utilisation du mot thé dans l'esprit d'un Britannique:

    "Par analogie, le mot désigne, dans certaines régions de la francophonie ou certaines régions de France une infusion préparée à partir d'autres plantes (par ex. thé de tilleul) bien que l'on doive parler plus proprement de tisane. De même dans certains pays où le thé ne fait pas partie d'une culture ancienne (Allemands ou Italiens parlent ainsi de "Tee" et de "Tè" quelle que soit la plante utilisée) et où le café prédomine largement le secteur des boissons chaudes."

    > may I reply that it is just as awkward for us Frogs to go to Britain, ask for coffee, and be served hm.... "dishwater"?

    Je m'imagine mal à Londres demander "un petit noir", "un café serré", un "double expresso", une "noisette", un "grand crème" et me contente généralement d'un "white ou d'un black coffee" ;)
     

    RuK

    Senior Member
    English/lives France
    Ah non, ce n'est plus le cas, on demande un latte, un macchiato, un espresso, et grâce à Starbucks et ses émules ça a toutes les chances de bien se passer à Londres.

    Pour info, le thé rouge ou Rooibos est une infusion sud-Africaine sans feuilles de thé proprement dit.
     

    Teafrog

    Senior Member
    UK English (& rusty French…)
    Hm a storm in a teacup, isn't it? The joke just had to come out one day :D.

    May i suggest the excellent book A year in the Merde by Stephen Clarke, which has a whole chapter, dealing extensively with this never-ended (and hopefully never-ending) war?
    I am well acquainted with the hilarious “A year in the merde” as well as its sequel, “Merde actually (not as funny, imo); I have them on my bookshelf.
    I hear Stephen Clarke has also released “In the Merde for Love”, “Talk to the Snail: Ten Commandments for Understanding the French” and “God Save La France a Year in the Merde”.
    I can’t remember the chapter dealing with “tea”, as it’s been some time since I read the books.

    …] I think, we, French, do call thé anykind of beverage made from leaves of tea tree (théier) from any countries (China, Ceylan ...), herbal teas are tisanes (as it is in English, isn't it ?) or infusions.
    As for rooibos tea, we call it in an improper way "thé rouge". [...]

    I don't know if it could help you to understand, but here is how I use those terms:
    • une infusion : terme générique regroupant toute sorte de boissons chaudes avec des plantes (thé compris)
    • une tisane : une infusion mais qui n'est pas du thé
    • un thé : une infusion faite uniquement avec des feuilles de thé. Donc, euh... du thé. Mais comme l'a souligné PZ (avec le thé rouge) y'aurait des abus de langage... :rolleyes:
    Thank you for your responses, PZ and KaRiNe. Could I check that I’ve understood you correctly (for posterity…)?

    Any tea made from the tea bush (Camellia sinensis) only = Thé
    Herbal teas (blackcurrant, cranberry, raspberry, elderflower, etc) = “Infusions” and “Tisanes” > these two terms are completely interchangeable. (?!)
    Rooibos (from the Red Bush tea) = thé rouge (that’s logical enough).

    You seem to differ when you talk about tisane/infusion.
    “Infusion” seems to be the safer option, as it’s universally understood (right?).

    Therefore, anyone could go to France and be immediately understood if they ask for “une infusion de thé” or “une infusion de cassis” or “une infusion de canneberge” or “une infusion de franboise” or “une infusion de sureau”.
    Or
    Ask for all the above ingredients (minus “thé”), using “tisane de XYZ” and they will be equally understood. Is that correct?

    Assuming I’ve got it right (at long last), how is ‘mint tea’ translated then? With the above logic, it should be “tisane à la menthe” or “infusion de menthe”. I have heard this called “Thé à la menthe”. Which is it?

    Rooibos is always called thé rouge. […]. However, in more than 20 years of asking for tea, at least occasionally, in restaurants and cafés I have never once been served anything but black tea. If there's a choice of green tea, or jasmin, or herbal, the waiter asks.
    That’s interesting, RuK. For the other sorts (green tea, jasmin or herbal), how are they referred to? Une infusion, tisane or thé?
    En France nous parlons plutôt de thé noir (les Chinois ne comprennent pas pourquoi) que de thé rouge.

    Nous connaissons aussi le thé vert et même le thé blanc. Is that tea with milk?

    De la même façon, nous parlons de thé à la menthe puisqu'il s'agit de thé noir infusé avec des feuilles de menthe. Thanks for that

    Pour le reste, j'invite Teafrog à se "connecthé" sur les nombreux sites francophones proposés par les amoureux du thé.

    Je me permets juste de "cithé" Wikipedia, quant à la confusion que peut induire l'utilisation du mot thé dans l'esprit d'un Britannique:

    "Par analogie, le mot désigne, dans certaines régions de la francophonie ou certaines régions de France une infusion préparée à partir d'autres plantes (par ex. thé de tilleul) bien que l'on doive parler plus proprement de tisane. De même dans certains pays où le thé ne fait pas partie d'une culture ancienne (Allemands ou Italiens parlent ainsi de "Tee" et de "Tè" quelle que soit la plante utilisée) et où le café prédomine largement le secteur des boissons chaudes."

    > may I reply that it is just as awkward for us Frogs to go to Britain, ask for coffee, and be served hm.... "dishwater"?

    Je m'imagine mal à Londres demander "un petit noir", "un café serré", un "double expresso", une "noisette", un "grand crème" et me contente généralement d'un "white ou d'un black coffee" ;)
    Merci pour vos infos et jeux de mots, Grignotine, qui ont éthé appréciés. ;). L'idée de base était de différencier clairement les termes pour les "thés". Cela n'est pas du tout évident, vu tous les posts et bouquins sur le sujet :rolleyes:.
    Est-ce que vous avez un ou deux exemples de "sites francophones proposés par les amoureux du thé”?

    Je partage votre avis en ce qui concerne “la pissette” qui est vendue dans la plupart des endroits en GB, et qui passe comme ‘café’. Pour avoir une 'bonne' tasse, il faut malheureusement payer les yeux de la tête et aller dans un "coffee bar", mais qui ne vend pas toute la panoplie de cafés qu’il y a dans les pays latins.:eek: Surtout pas un "noisette" ou un "sérré" :rolleyes:

    Merci à tous pour vos contributions :)
     

    Nicomon

    Senior Member
    Langue française ♀
    I realise I'm late to the tea party. ;)

    I thought you might enjoy this bilingual website and this French website

    To me thé à la menthe is thé aromatisé (à la menthe)... there has to be tea in the beverage.
    If it's mint only, then I say tisane de menthe. Peppermint would be menthe poivrée.

    However be it black darjeerling, green or scented, I never put milk in my tea (I like earl grey, with a twist of lemon). So I guess that whether or not you put milk in it has more to do with taste than the kind of tea.

    As for infusion... well, for a reason I can't really pinpoint, the word sounds a bit like medecine to me. As does décoction. :p
     

    Punky Zoé

    Senior Member
    Pau
    France - français
    Well, I think you got it Teafrog, just to be more precise (and maybe to confuse a little bit more) :

    About tea, we don't really say "une infusion de thé", simply "un thé", but it is not improper as we do say "laisser infuser le thé" (in order not to get dishwater :p).

    In France, the word tisane is widely used, infusion too, but it is IMHO more formal. If you like experiences, try to order une infusion de canneberge in a café...:rolleyes:

    About mint tea, if you are talking about green (not black)tea leaves with peppermint leaves, it is, indeed, "thé à la menthe" (a maghrebian beverage). You may also drink an infusion made of peppermint leaves only (without tea leaves).
     

    grignotine

    Member
    France, French
    Ah non, ce n'est plus le cas, on demande un latte, un macchiato, un espresso, ...

    ... oppure un ristretto/corto, un lungo, un corretto... certo, ma allora dobbiamo anche parlare l'italiano, cosi tutto a posto!
    :rolleyes:
    Traduction: ... ou bien encore .... c'est sûr, mais alors il faut aussi parler l'italien , et alors tout va bien.

    La formule de Starbucks est une adaptation américaine de l'Italien.

    Cafe latte = 1-3 shots of espresso with the rest of the cup filled with steamed milk and a bit of froth/foam
    Cappucino = 1-3 shots of espresso with some steamed milk and at least 1/3 (sometimes close to 1/2) the cup filled with froth
    Espresso macchiato = 1-3 shots of espresso with a "spot" (touch) of froth on top
    Espresso con panna = 1-3 shots of espresso with a touch of whipped cream on top

    alors qu'en Italie on parle de caffè (corto/stretto, lungo, macchiato, corretto,) sans préciser.

    Usually, one shot (5,6 grams of coffee).
    Corto/ristretto = short/strong
    Lungo= long/weak
    Corretto= laced with liquor

    Mais revenons à nos moutons, comme aurait dit Jeanne d'Arc ;)

    ______________________________________________________________

    Pour infusion, la réponse a été donnée maintes fois dans ce long fil de dicussion et parfaitement résumée dans Wikipedia:

    "L'infusion est une méthode d'extraction des principes actifs d'une préparation végétale par dissolution dans un liquide initialement bouillant que l'on laisse refroidir. Le terme désigne aussi les boissons préparées par cette méthode, comme les tisanes ou le thé par exemple.
    Cette opération s'oppose à la décoction dans laquelle le liquide est maintenu bouillant, et à la macération dans laquelle le liquide est froid. Le solvant n'est pas nécessairement de l'eau, cela peut être également une huile ou un alcool."


    __________________________________________________________________
     

    grignotine

    Member
    France, French
    About mint tea, if you are talking about green (not black)tea leaves with peppermint leaves, it is, indeed, "thé à la menthe" (a maghrebian beverage).

    True, most of the time it is made with gunpowder (green tea) in Maghreb, ie Morrrocco, Algeria and Tunisia; (maghreb = western, where the sun sets).

    However, in Al Jazeira (= litt, the peninsula), ie central Arabic countries, the leaves used to make tea are what we wrongfully refer to as black tea (see above: mistranslation of the Chinese word meaning red).
     

    Robbyn

    Senior Member
    Français, arabe
    Mhhh:). So you think the French refer to 'black tea' (such as Indian or African teas) with milk' as "thé", and all other herbal teas as "infusion"? Correct?

    What would the French call, say, Rooibos tea (from South Africa, 'Red Bush tea) which is not of the "tea plant" you describe; une tisane de Rooibos? What about a peppermint tea, is it un thé à la menthe or une tisane de menthe; and how is "peppermint tea" differenciated from "spearmint tea"? What about Chinese green tea? Is it "thé" or "tisane", as it is drunk without milk?

    This is at the very root of my Q, and I would like a few French connoisseurs (I'm confident our French friends can figure out what this means :D) to explain the difference between, and what is meant by "tisane", "thé au fruits" (herbal teas?) and "thé" (have I missed any?).
    It is often awkward for Brits to go to France, ask for a tea , and be given some weird stuff resembling dishwater :eek:

    Robbyn and Nannis2001 both come from (French and Arabic speaking) countries, where tea is used extensively. They describe "tea" (in general term) as pouring boiling water over any soluble substance. There is no mention of "tisane". As far as I'm concerned, a "tisane" and an "infusion" are the same thing.
    I am still confused :confused:, as you may have gathered.

    Could a kind (French) soul pleeeeeeeease put me out of my plight, as well as nailing this long-standing confusion between Brits and their Gallic cousins? :)
    Ta!
    My dear Teafrog
    I've never describe tea (in general term) as pouring boiled water over any soluble substance. I gave "infusion" definition, a term wich embody every kind of tea and other tisane......
    Here's the definition of tea on le maxidico :
    Thé : feuilles de théier qui servent souvent à préparer des infusions (here we go again); thé vert : cueilli et immédiatement torréfié; thé noir : légèrement fermenté.....
    Here in Algeria we prepare tea by adding fresh or dry mint, as the same way that we could add jasmine, red fruit or anything else, it still stay tea, chacun ses goûts.
    Anyway I thought that the thread was about "INFUSION" and not about tea:eek:
    Have nice day.
    PS : Grignotine el jazira means island, île.:)
     

    grignotine

    Member
    France, French
    I am well acquainted with the hilarious “A year in the merde” as well as its sequel, “Merde actually (not as funny, imo); I have them on my bookshelf.
    I hear Stephen Clarke has also released “In the Merde for Love”, “Talk to the Snail: Ten Commandments for Understanding the French” and “God Save La France a Year in the Merde”.
    I can’t remember the chapter dealing with “tea”, as it’s been some time since I read the books.

    Well, i lent "A year in the Merde" to a Columbian girl, so i can't find the chapter rignt now; sorry about that. :eek:
    By the way, this year Stephen Clerk released Merde Happens "What happens when an Englishman, an American and a Franchwoman drive across the USA in a Mini? , Bantam Press.

    Any tea made from the tea bush (Camellia sinensis) only = Thé
    Herbal teas (blackcurrant, cranberry, raspberry, elderflower, etc) = “Infusions” and “Tisanes” > these two terms are completely interchangeable. (?!)
    NO, see above or below:D

    You seem to differ when you talk about tisane/infusion.
    “Infusion” seems to be the safer option, as it’s universally understood (right?).
    Not necessarily :D, you would probably order "une infusion de camomille" in a restaurant (plus chic) and be offered "une tisane" in a French family... Although, people might wonder if you've got stomach or liver-problems.

    Therefore, anyone could go to France and be immediately understood if they ask for “une infusion de thé” or “une infusion de cassis” or “une infusion de canneberge” or “une infusion de franboise” or “une infusion de sureau”.
    Or
    Ask for all the above ingredients (minus “thé”), using “tisane de XYZ” and they will be equally understood. Is that correct?


    That’s interesting, RuK. For the other sorts (green tea, jasmin or herbal), how are they referred to? Une infusion, tisane or thé?
    green tea: thé vert
    jasmin: thé au jasmin, thé parfumé (au jasmin)
    herbal: tisane


    Merci pour vos infos et jeux de mots, Grignotine, qui ont éthé appréciés. ;).
    Est-ce que vous avez un ou deux exemples de "sites francophones proposés par les amoureux du thé”?
    http://www.miroir.com/the/
    http://www.culture-the.info/


    Et merci à vous, Teafrog pour avoir lancé cette excellente discussion.:)

    > robbin: that's what i had written in the first place, then i cross-checked with wiki before posting and saw they translate it as peninsula : pheww i'm relieved ;) i was wondering if Ali, one ot my Tunisian friends in Marseilles had been wrong there...

    Sorry guys, i must "leaf" you know: time for "un petit noir" with Ali, precisely :D

    Have a nice day!
     

    Teafrog

    Senior Member
    UK English (& rusty French…)
    In conclusion. First, thank you ever so much, all of you, for contributing your answers and viewpoints. For the record, I didn’t start this thread, which was originally on “infusion”. Something prompted me to check on WR the (age-old) confusion and difference between infusion, tisane, tea and herbal tea (in the UK, as in the USA it seems, we only have ‘tea’ and ‘herbal tea’). Perhaps a moderator (?) could rename this thread to include the word "tea" for posterity and ease of finding it in the WR dict.

    I used the words “dishwater’ for the tea often served in France; the tea (bag) still floating in milk and hot water, therefore not being able to infuse properly, as it requires boiling water to do so. The term was a little too harsh and I apologise for it :eek:. It simply means that the French cannot understand how the milk comes into the equation… :rolleyes:

    This thread taught me a lot of new things (thanks again). I had never heard of “thé blanc”, until Grignotine and Nicomon mentioned it. The following (synopsis) is how my understanding of what has been said; I do sincerely hope I get it right!

    ‘Tisane’ is a universally understood term. “Infusion” is the same thing, only a ‘posher’ (more formal) name.

    What we, in the UK, call “herbal tea” is “tisane” (i.e. tisane de tilleul); apart from N. Africa (e.g. Robbyn’s Algeria) where they are all called “teas”.

    Mint tea (great for digestion, by the way) is the one I’m slightly unsure about. Nicomon (in Canada) calls the ‘mint-leaves-only’ (the only way to drink the stuff, imo) as “tisane”, whereas PZ (in France) and Robbyn (in Algeria) call in “thé à la menthe”. I will therefore stick to the latter term.

    Chinese green tea (no milk) is not a “tisane” but “thé vert”.

    It looks as if Rooibos tea is the odd one out as, imo, it is best boiled (not infused) to extract the flavour from its little spines (very tight leaves?); this is still called “tea” by all and sundry - so no problem there.

    'Extra' coffee info: Starbucks and other chains of the same ilk, have become familiar in the UK, but imo doe not serve proper European/N.African coffee, but an American-style one (apologies to the Americans…). It is ‘diluted’ coffee, to my taste buds. As Grignotine so eloquently and precisely explained, these coffees are made to a formula! Having said this, their type of coffee (believe it or not) is marginally better than the old fashioned coffee (dishwater) we Brits used to serve to unfortunate overseas visitors :eek: – so things are improving… slowly! :p

    Grignotine, merci pour vos posts détaillés et plein d’humour. Le lien "miroir" a bien marché (super site :thumbsup: !), mais celui de "culture" a malheureusement bloqué…


    Thanks again to y’all. Have a great day. :)
     

    geve

    Senior Member
    France, French
    Hé hé, just found this thread :D
    I don't understand why you insist to put milk in your tea, Teafrog :rolleyes: :p Milk is just an additional ingredient, it doesn't change the name of the drink. Just ask for un thé avec un nuage de lait, like the British fellow in Astérix. :D

    You asked how to order a herbal tea in France. Well, if you hesitate between the words tisane and infusion (it seems that the latter might indeed include tea depending on the person, being also the term for the process of infusing; but I think that if you specifically ask for an infusion in a restaurant or café they would assume you want something else than thé), I have good news for you: you can drop both! :D Just say: Une verveine s'il vous plaît. Je voudrais un tilleul-menthe. Vous avez de la camomille ?
    But that implies that you know what kind of herbal tea you want, and you have to hope that they have it.
     

    Robbyn

    Senior Member
    Français, arabe
    What we, in the UK, call “herbal tea” is “tisane” (i.e. tisane de tilleul); apart from N. Africa (e.g. Robbyn’s Algeria) where they are all called “teas”.

    Mint tea (great for digestion, by the way) is the one I’m slightly unsure about. Nicomon (in Canada) calls the ‘mint-leaves-only’ (the only way to drink the stuff, imo) as “tisane”, whereas PZ (in France) and Robbyn (in Algeria) call in “thé à la menthe”. I will therefore stick to the latter term.
    Bonjour tout le monde et particulièrement Teafrog.
    Je récapitule, j'ai dit qu'on prépare le thé (ici en Algérie et à mon humble avis partout où l'on se trouve sur la planète) avec des feuilles de thé et qu'ensuite chacun l'aromatise à son goût. Il se trouve qu'en Algérie le thé le plus fréquent est le thé à la menthe (juste au cas où je donne la recette bien que je ne sois pas une spécialiste):
    -On fait bouillir de l'eau.
    -Dans une théière on met des feuilles de thé et des feuilles de menthe verte (spearmint).
    -On verse l'eau bouillante sur les feuilles de thé et la menthe et on laisse "infuser".
    -On peut même rajouter des clous de girofle (c'est une histoire de goût).

    D'autre part ici on appelle tisane toutes les infusions à base de plantes (ex : tisane à la menthe, qui est exclusivement préparée à base d'eau et de feuilles de menthe)
    Teafrog une bonne tasse de tisane à la menthe c'est bon avant de dormir, il parait que ça a des vertus apaisantes.
    Bonne journée à tous.
     

    grignotine

    Member
    France, French
    Bonjour tout le monde et particulièrement Teafrog.

    Je récapitule, j'ai dit qu'on prépare le thé (ici en Algérie et à mon humble avis partout où l'on se trouve sur la planète) avec des feuilles de thé et qu'ensuite chacun l'aromatise à son goût. Il se trouve qu'en Algérie le thé le plus fréquent est le thé à la menthe (juste au cas où je donne la recette bien que je ne sois pas une spécialiste):
    -On fait bouillir de l'eau.
    -Dans une théière on met des feuilles de thé et des feuilles de menthe verte (spearmint).
    -On verse l'eau bouillante sur les feuilles de thé et la menthe et on laisse "infuser".
    -On peut même rajouter des clous de girofle (c'est une histoire de goût).
    _______________________________________________________________
    D'autre part ici on appelle tisane toutes les infusions à base de plantes (ex
    ________________________________________________________________
    le thé n'est pas une plante? ;)

    d'autre part, il me semble que tu as oublié le sucre dans ta recette (mdr)
    enfin, c'est comme cela que j'ai appris à faire le thé au Sahara ! (sans jeu de mots, pour une fois;))

    comme indiqué ici http://www.marmiton.org/recettes.cfm?num_recette=11146
     

    Robbyn

    Senior Member
    Français, arabe
    ________________________________________________________________
    le thé n'est pas une plante? ;)

    d'autre part, il me semble que tu as oublié le sucre dans ta recette (mdr)
    enfin, c'est comme cela que j'ai appris à faire le thé au Sahara ! (sans jeu de mots, pour une fois;))

    comme indiqué ici http://www.marmiton.org/recettes.cfm?num_recette=11146
    Salut Grignotine
    Effectivement le thé est une plante et dans ce cas on appellerait une infusion de thé de manière basique "une tisane de thé" (et là on s'en sortirait plus), mais je ne voulais pas trop compliquer les choses pour Teafrog qui croyait que chez moi on appelait "thé" toutes infusions de plantes.
    D'autre part ma chère Grignotine, en ce qui concerne le sucre, je ne l'ai pas rajouté parce que cela va de soit et puis il y a des personnes qui le prennent sans sucre (là c'est un autre débat "sucre ou pas sucre ou encore sucrette":):D)
    En tous cas je peux te dire que le "thé" n'est pas trop ma "tasse de thé";).
    Allez bonne journée à tous.
     
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