Inside as well as outside

Silver

Senior Member
Chinese,Cantonese,Sichuan dialect
Hi,

I wrote the following short paragraph:

There are many looks-good but tastes-bad restaurants here in Chongqing, but this Italian restaurant is really good, inside as well as outside.

I want to say that the restaurant not only offers good food but also is good-looking, and I used the term, but I guess I am not correct this time. I want to shorten my sentence so I made up some phrases here, someone knows what I meant, but I want to learn idiomatic English.

I need your help.
 
  • Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    I think it's fine, and very creative; "looks-good-but-tastes-bad restaurants" could describe many places I've been. (Note: I added a couple of hyphens, since I think it's all one compound adjective.)
     

    Silver

    Senior Member
    Chinese,Cantonese,Sichuan dialect
    Thanks a lot, Parla.

    I still want to know whether "inside as well as outside" is fine, I think "inside as well as the outside" is also fine.
     

    exgerman

    Senior Member
    NYC
    English but my first language was German
    Thanks a lot, Parla.

    I still want to know whether "inside as well as outside" is fine, I think "inside as well as the outside" is also fine.
    You can say it with or without the, but the two have to match. "the inside as well as the outside" or "inside as well as outside" but not a mixture.

    You can also say "on the inside as well as on the outside".
     

    Silver

    Senior Member
    Chinese,Cantonese,Sichuan dialect
    Thanks a lot.

    I wonder "inside" here wouldn't be understood as "interior part of the restaurant"? I used "inside" here to mean "the food, service" while "outside" refers to "decoration, environment".
     

    perpend

    Banned
    American English
    It really is both interesting and creative. In PP-Land it goes like this:
    There are many looks-good but tastes-bad restaurants here in Chongqing, but this Italian restaurant is really good both on the exterior and on the taste inside.

    It's a toughy, Silver.
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    This is fine: There are many looks-good-but-tastes-bad restaurants here in Chongqing, but this Italian restaurant is really good, inside as well as outside.

    Since you have established looks (outside) and taste (inside) in the first part of your sentence, we know what you're talking about. There is no ambiguity in thinking you are talking inside decor and outside appearance.
     

    perpend

    Banned
    American English
    Since you have established looks (outside) and taste (inside) in the first part of your sentence, we know what you're talking about. There is no ambiguity in thinking you are talking inside decor and outside appearance.
    I couldn't deduce that from Silver's post.
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    I couldn't deduce that from Silver's post.
    Why not? It is there in his compound adjective: looks good vs tastes bad is established. His next comment builds directly on it.
    I like it as you wrote it, Silver, it is great to see you being creative in your own writing.
     

    Silver

    Senior Member
    Chinese,Cantonese,Sichuan dialect
    Thanks a lot, everyone.

    I wrote this sentence without giving much thoughts to it, actually. I think it sounds fine to my non-native ears. But after I read Parla's comments, I thought it might be incorrect, because "inside" might refers to something different, as well as "outside". Because I think, first of all, "inside" doesn't inlcude the meaning "food in the restaurant", but "outside" is clearer, at least the listeners would know that it means the "exterior of something".

    But later Copy said something and that's really helpful, since it's in a sentence, I then immediately understood. But I'd wrote down both versions in my notebook not simply because they are your corrections of my mistakes, very good English, but also because I want to learn different ways or clear ways to express myself, since I live in China, a country where there aren't too many people who can understand writings like this, I mean writings require them to stop and think.

    I have one last question:

    There are many looks-good-but-tastes-bad restaurants here in Chongqing, but this Italian restaurant is really good, inside as well as outside.
    I wonder if the comma "," after "really good" is better to be ":", this. Thanks a lot

    Thanks a lot, PP, Parla, Copy and Suzi.
     
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