Inside the “Tsarina of the Orient” bathtub every woman feel

L3P

Senior Member
Russian,Ukrainian
Hi,guys. In the description of a therapeutic bath I`m not sure weather to use "a" or not: "...like a Cleopatra" or "...like Cleopatra"?
Would appreaciate if someone explained the difference.

Thanks.
 
  • L3P

    Senior Member
    Russian,Ukrainian
    In the phrase that forms the title of this thread, the qualifies bathtub, not Tsarina. So like a Cleopatra is not relevant.
    Thanks,se16teddy. Where could I use "a" before proper nouns like Cleopatra and the like? Like, he felt like a Schwarzenegger...
     
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    Schlabberlatz

    Senior Member
    German - Germany
    I don’t think it makes sense. There is (was) only one Cleopatra. But you could say "like a queen" or something like that. There is more than one queen.

    You should be careful about thread titles. There is a maximum length, the rest gets cut. You could have chosen "like a Cleopatra" as your thread title.
     

    se16teddy

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Sorry, I misunderstood the question.

    Where a historical or literary character is an archetype, we sometimes treat the name as countable:
    She's a little Cleopatra. Even though she is only twelve, she insists on wearing lipstick.
    All his friends are Lotharios.
     

    se16teddy

    Senior Member
    English - England
    "Like a Cleopatra" is possible, but I feel that it might sound more disapproving (or even more disapproving) than "like Cleopatra". A countable Cleopatra is somehow less human and respectable and venerable than Cleopatra herself.
     
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    L3P

    Senior Member
    Russian,Ukrainian
    Sorry, I misunderstood the question.

    Where a historical or literary character is an archetype, we sometimes treat the name as countable:
    She's a little Cleopatra. Even though she is only twelve, she insists on wearing lipstick.
    All his friends are Lotharios.
    Thanks a lot,se16teddy. How would an English-speaking person rephrase the sentence "She's a little Cleopatra...."? Something like "She behaves like Cleopatra"?
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    Your question has a difficulty: to be a Cleopatra" differs greatly from "to be a little Cleopatra." It would be far better without "little" - "little" makes it quite difficult to answer clearly because its significance has to be explained.

    "She's a little Cleopatra...."? = (i) "She is very young but has [some of] the attributes of Cleopatra." or "She has [some of] the less positive attributes of Cleopatra." or "She has some indications of the attributes of Cleopatra but in a charming way."

    Little in [little + noun/proper noun] can mean (i) small/young or (ii) be a negative intensifier, (iii) a moderating adjective.
     

    L3P

    Senior Member
    Russian,Ukrainian
    Your question has a difficulty: to be a Cleopatra" differs greatly from "to be a little Cleopatra." It would be far better without "little" - "little" makes it quite difficult to answer clearly because its significance has to be explained.

    "She's a little Cleopatra...."? = (i) "She is very young but has [some of] the attributes of Cleopatra." or "She has [some of] the less positive attributes of Cleopatra." or "She has some indications of the attributes of Cleopatra but in a charming way."

    Little in [little + noun/proper noun] can mean (i) small/young or (ii) be a negative intensifier, (iii) a moderating adjective.

    Thanks,PaulQ,I appreciate your help,& good luck!
     
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